Shipped Eggs Oxygen Bubble Wrap

FARMminiature

In the Brooder
Apr 12, 2021
21
10
26
I’ve hatched eggs for most of my life. These last three years, I have hatched shipped eggs from 0 to 95% hatch rate. I’ve noticed a lot of places suggesting to wrap eggs in bubble wrap. Because shipping plays a huge variable, I wonder if that’s why I have had the least amount of success in plastic, bubble-wrapped eggs overly taped. Doesn’t the plastic affect the egg from getting oxygen resulting in a bad batch?
 

FoodFreedomNow

Free Ranging
5 Years
Aug 11, 2016
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I wrap my eggs in bubble wrap, but leave a space for airflow at the top. I'd suspect shipping damage from shaking as the primary culprit if you have eggs developing but not hatching, rather than the bubble wrap/tape. What are you seeing, developmentally, with those eggs?
 

FARMminiature

In the Brooder
Apr 12, 2021
21
10
26
I wrap my eggs in bubble wrap, but leave a space for airflow at the top. I'd suspect shipping damage from shaking as the primary culprit if you have eggs developing but not hatching, rather than the bubble wrap/tape. What are you seeing, developmentally, with those eggs?
I placed my shipped eggs in two incubators (Brinsea Ovation and Hovabator) and also some from my own chickens for variable (which I always do). Brinsea: I had turn automatically. Hovabator: I hand turned. First two days I didn’t turn them and had them pointy end down. I had 100% of my 8 eggs from the backyard hatch (4 in each incubator). This last particular shipped batch was completely wrapped in bubble wrap and what I felt was ridiculously over taped, the air pockets looked phenomenal compared to most shipped that are saddlebacks differing in degree. Most of the shipped eggs looked good at day 8 (a couple blood rings and one that didn’t take off). I was expecting a good turnout. I usually do a second look during lockdown, but I didn’t do that this last time. On day 25 I cracked open the eggs to see what happened. 2 out of 30 hatched. The rest died at differing stages and some were fully developed and dead. Looking at all the shipped eggs that I have hatched, all of the bubble wrapped eggs (except one batch which the eggs weren’t completely covered with the bubble wrap and barely taped that gave about a 95% hatch rate) have done horrendous compared to others wrapped with bounty towels, toilet paper, shavings, or similar. I guess this last hatch really stunned me. Any advice on shipped eggs would be phenomenal.
 

FARMminiature

In the Brooder
Apr 12, 2021
21
10
26
Oh! I give the eggs an 18-24 hour rest pointy end down at room temperature. I feel like my best hatched batches have been to let them have that rest, not turn first two days in incubator, and then turn on the automatic turner. Weed out eggs on day 8 and at lockdown. I have paid for faster shipping especially during covid, but I didn’t notice a difference. I have 4 different sets of eggs purchased from various places being shipped to me at the moment. I plan to put two sets under two different hens. The other two sets are going in my Brinsea.
 

Mellowmalt

Songster
Jan 24, 2021
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I agree with kiki.

The only two theoretical possible drawbacks of using plastic as you have mentioned would be the plastic contact being bad or the eggs suffocating.

Considering that the egg is not growing at all - it is in suspended animation and not even developed yet while shipping I would presume the aircell and any air around the bubbles would be plenty.

The plastic leaching chemicals affecting the eggs to abort a week later is a bit unlikely

Saddlebacks cause me the biggest problems with shipped eggs so I'd want them wrapped in as much bubblewrap as possible but I would also want to know why those eggs then still did badly too. Mystery for the chicken gods considering it could be many reasons

we've had very bad weather recently, how cold was it when they were posted?
 
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FARMminiature

In the Brooder
Apr 12, 2021
21
10
26
I think I am too sporadic and buy from several different places (cheap and expensive). I started buying eggs online for breeds that I couldn’t find to ship chicks online. I definitely have had repeat buys from certain places depending on shipping, packaging and fertility. I wanted to perfect hatching shipped eggs and know how much the weather could affect at purchasing different times of the year. Unfortunately, it can get expensive fast. I’ve experimented with differing lengths of having the eggs lay horizontally and vertically gently and barely moving at differing lengths depending on severity to see if anything made a difference. Shipping obviously plays a huge role. I went to post office and watched a young worker shake my eggs laughing at why someone would buy eggs and give a petrified look at seeing me. We all make stupid mistakes, so I just ignored it and stopped buying shipped eggs for a long while.
 

FARMminiature

In the Brooder
Apr 12, 2021
21
10
26
I agree with kiki.

The only two theoretical possible drawbacks of using plastic as you have mentioned would be the plastic contact being bad or the eggs suffocating.

Considering that the egg is not growing at all - it is in suspended animation and not even developed yet while shipping I would presume the aircell and any air around the bubbles would be plenty.

The plastic leaching chemicals affecting the eggs to abort a week later is a bit unlikely

Saddlebacks cause me the biggest problems with shipped eggs so I'd want them wrapped in as much bubblewrap as possible but I would also want to know why those eggs then still did badly too. Mystery for the chicken gods considering it could be many reasons

we've had very bad weather recently, how cold was it when they were posted?
Thank you so much for your input, and I love your witty mystery for the chicken gods! That bad burst of weather came while the eggs were in the incubator. We never lost electricity, but it was definitely a little bit cooler. Throughout the few years of shipped eggs, I always felt like the ones bubble wrapped performed worse or not at all (except the one I mentioned that wasn’t fully wrapped and left the two ends to air, even in what seemed like prime weather to buy. I guess I am curious why you would want a bunch of bubble wrapped eggs? And have you had better hatches with fully bubble wrapped vs foam or paper type fillings? I still wonder if the eggs are being cut off from a certain amount of oxygen? If a living organism was put in a sealed off box, how long would it be okay with the amount of oxygen in that box? That’s where my thinking goes with the eggs completely wrapped in bubble wrap and heavily taped up. Shipping is obviously rough! What’s truly the best packaging for best possible hatch of shipped eggs? Also, what are your opinions on the eggs being shipped horizontally or vertically with pointy end down? Do you think that can help prevent the saddlebacks from being as bad?
 

Mellowmalt

Songster
Jan 24, 2021
890
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UK
I'm no expert on how eggs are shipped but I have had plenty arrive in a bad condition.
Just tonight I lost an egg that was the only good one to arrive but after 7 days it gave up so clearly not good like the rest in that package.
So yes for me they should be wrapped as well as possible based on my luck.
I breed insects for my bearded dragon and they can survive for weeks without any fresh air in a sealed container so air is needed but small animals need surprisingly little.
It is also possible to sleep in a closed car with no windows open for 12 hours and we wouldn't run out of air. So to me air is not as important as safe handling.

Edit: but if each egg were wrapped really tight in clingfilm for example and stuck in the post for 3 days that might be bad. So depends how tightly they were wrapped and how long for. Maybe it was detrimental and we should take it into consideraton when posting.
 

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