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3D Modeling for Coops (& appliances)

post #1 of 127
Thread Starter 

I recently created a (rough) 3D model of a Woods style coop in SketchUp. Link to it below.

 

First though, for the uninitiated, SketchUp is 3D modeling software. The non-pro version, SketchUp Make, that is free for personal use.

http://www.sketchup.com/

 

Link to download SketchUp Make:

http://www.sketchup.com/download?sketchup=make

 

3D modeling software can require a fair amount of computing power. Nowadays, most all fairly-new computers will meet the minimum system requirements in order to operate the software effectively.

 

If you aren't sure if yours does, there is a "SketchUp Checkup" program you can run to find out:

http://help.sketchup.com/en/sucheck

 

You may find that once you start using 3D models for building projects, you're hooked, and find them essential.

Have a good model is like have a good set of drafting plans, souped up with modern tech.

 

Besides being able to view each part of your project, and how it comes together, you can have a look at things like how the sun will hit your building on any given day or time of the year.

 

People can be intimidated by the learning curve. I know I was. The good news: it is fairly easy to learn *just enough* to be able to get a look at things.

 

There is also a lot of instruction available. Just search the internet, and you'll find plenty of articles and videos explaining how to do different things.

 

SketchUp is the program I know about. If there are others, please let me know!

 

I think that having a good repository on this forum of actual coop plans, above and beyond all the great pictures and descriptions that are already available, would be a huge asset.

 

I'm writing this post in hopes that maybe others agree, and would like to contribute to the effort.

 

I've already posted links to the (very) (rough) plan for a chicken coop I put together on 2 other threads, but I think that 3D modeling is enough it's own subject, that I've started a new thread on it.

 

So here again is a link to the (again, very rough) plan for a chicken coop I adapted from the design from chapter 6 (p. 59+) from "Open-air Poultry Houses for All Climates: A Practical Book on Modern Common Sense Poultry Housing for Beginners and Veterans in Poultry Keeping. What to Build and how to Do It. Houses that Will Promote Health, Vigor and Vitality in Laying and Breeding Stock"

google ebook link: https://books.google.com/books/about/Open_air_Poultry_Houses_for_All_Climates.html?id=o08PAAAAYAAJ

 

Here's a link to the SketchUp model:

https://3dwarehouse.sketchup.com/model.html?id=e0da2445-ad99-4787-8811-a2334c967353

 

While that link will show you an image of my design, to really see it you have to download and install the software.

http://www.sketchup.com/download?sketchup=make

 

I know for myself, having a good model will help me immensely when I build a new coop.

 

Are others either already familiar with making 3D models, or interested in learning how, and willing to start putting some of these coop designs together?

 

If so, please reply to this thread with your thoughts, and we'll find out if this is something the community is interested in.

post #2 of 127

Very cool. You are going to put guys like me who draw ideas on napkins or if we want to get really fancy graph paper, out of business!

 

How long does it take to create a 3D drawing of a coop?

post #3 of 127
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by thomasboyle View Post

Very cool. You are going to put guys like me who draw ideas on napkins or if we want to get really fancy graph paper, out of business!

How long does it take to create a 3D drawing of a coop?

Depends on 3 things:

1. How complicated the design is
2. How precise you decide to be
3. How good you are at it

So anywhere between 5 minutes and 5 months.

I probably put a couple hours into what I shared. A lot of that time was taken up figuring out what the actual design details were for the coop I was copying, and deciding on what to settle on when I couldn't.

Also, while I enjoy learning it, I'm by no means very good at SketchUp. Experts could of probably whipped that up in 5 minutes.
post #4 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by WesleyBeal View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by thomasboyle View Post

Very cool. You are going to put guys like me who draw ideas on napkins or if we want to get really fancy graph paper, out of business!

How long does it take to create a 3D drawing of a coop?

Depends on 3 things:

1. How complicated the design is
2. How precise you decide to be
3. How good you are at it

So anywhere between 5 minutes and 5 months.

I probably put a couple hours into what I shared. A lot of that time was taken up figuring out what the actual design details were for the coop I was copying, and deciding on what to settle on when I couldn't.

Also, while I enjoy learning it, I'm by no means very good at SketchUp. Experts could of probably whipped that up in 5 minutes.

That's pretty accurate....:gig.....The first one will take you 5 months, the next one 5 minutes.  

Brings to mind the 10,000 hours concept.

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #5 of 127

I gave Sketchup a try, got frustrated and went back to graph paper and a different sketching program I know, Canvas. Except my version of Canvas had expired, so will need to upgrade to keep using it.

 

How hard is it to sketch up something like my Woods mini?

 

 

 

What I ran into trouble with was with the dimensions, plus dragging and dropping and moving things around. I don't remember is Sketchup has scaled grids (digital graph paper), but would help me if it did.

post #6 of 127
Thread Starter 
I don't think that'd be too difficult to put together in SketchUp.

I'd like to try it, if you'd share with me the dimensions I can't see in this drawing.

I believe there are ways to do things in SketchUp a lot quicker than I do now. Like there's some way to save 2x material, so that whenever you want it you just paste it in and enter the length. Right now, I create every unique piece (I can of course copy/paste multiples of them as needed).
post #7 of 127

Do they have humans and animal models you can pop in there?

Always a great aspect to add to a drawing/model to give 'real life' scale.

 

Oh and can you do screen shots to post here?


Edited by aart - 12/23/16 at 2:56pm

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #8 of 127
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post

Do they have humans and animal models you can pop in there?
Always a great aspect to add to a drawing/model to give 'real life' scale.

Oh and can you do screen shots to post here?

Yeah, there are human/animal models. Haven't specifically looked at the chicken models, just know I've seen them.

I can grab screenshots. Will try to remember to do that next time I'm at my desk.
post #9 of 127
Thread Starter 
I'll add, SketchUp provides some models of people for sure. Then there's everything the community has created and shared. Lots of stuff.
post #10 of 127

I use both 2d and 3d to develop design concepts, some things are just easier and more clear using 2d.

A lot of my consulting work has just been making 3d models from 2d drawings for clients who can't 'see' an orthographic 2d drawing.

Always very satisfying to show a client a 3d model and see 'the light come on'...made many projects so much easier. 

Have done dozens of projects emailing screen shots of 3d models and dimensioned 2d drawings, throw in a few phone calls and then off to the fabricator.

<olddrafterdonebabbling> 

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
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