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Refridgerate or kitchen counter storage - Page 2

post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sydney Acres View Post

...The Salmonella issue could also explain the 45 day limit, as even refrigerated bacteria will eventually grow, just very slowly.
And the 45 day factory eggs are washed eggs, which probably is the main reason for their short storage life.
If some is good then more is better and too much is just enough.
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If some is good then more is better and too much is just enough.
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post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sydney Acres View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aart View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChickenLegs13 View Post

I sell eggs and they loose too much weight if not refrigerated. If they're borderliners, in several days a batch of Larges will turn into a batch of Mediums.

Really?! Hmmm....I'll have to experiment with that theory.

 

How many grams does an egg lose in..... say 3 days?


How quickly an egg loses weight would depend both on temperature and humidity.  Low temperature decreases evaporation to some degree, but high humidity also decreases evaporation.  Changing either of those two factors will affect your evaporation rate.  The slowest evaporation will occur at low temperatures with high humidity (cool and moist), and the fastest evaporation will occur at high temperatures with low humidity (warm and dry).  That's why I think my eggs last so long in the refrigerator in solid cardboard cartons -- the mild evaporation within the solid cartons raises the humidity within the cartons, and that minimizes any further evaporation.  With the vented cartons, the moisture that evaporates from the eggs is vented out and lost, so humidity stays low and the eggs dehydrate faster, despite being in the refrigerator.

 

To say that an egg at room temperature ages as much in a day as a refrigerated egg does in a week is a great way to get a point across, and is easy to remember, but is a hugely inaccurate generalization.  While most refrigerators have a fairly narrow range of temperatures and humidities, that cannot be said of "room temperatures."  Room temperature and humidity in Arizona during July is very different from that in Maine during February or Seattle during November.  There are many days when the temperature and humidity of my garage would provide much better storage conditions than my refrigerator! 

Good points, great write ups, thanks!

 

I was thinking about the house humidity in relation to 'testing' this...but seriously, with my low volume of eggs, I'm really not too concerned and won't bother about it.


Edited by aart - 2/13/15 at 4:28am

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply

Great article on VENTILATION, one of THE MOST IMPORTANT aspects of coop design.

Fantastic treatise to help decide how much SPACE your chickens need.

 

Chicken math is not just 'addition'...but also should include Division, Multiplication and especially Subtraction!!!

 

Quoting centrarchid:

"Make every effort to understand your chicken's biology and the environment that supports it."

Reply
post #13 of 17
In South Africa they sell eggs on the shelf. America refrigerates them. If your not grading them or selling them you can do whichever you prefer. I am with other people though that if your going to sell them you must refrigerate them. It's a matter of quality. Any chance to increase quality I would do it.
post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 

Sydney Acres,

 

Thank you for your great and detailed reply. I'll keep the dozen that I'm eating on the counter but now I'll keep the rest in the fridge.

This has been a wonderful learning experience.

1 Buff Orpington

1 Silver Laced Wynedotte

1 Black Australorp

1 Delaware

1 Welsummer

1 Plymouth Barred Rock

1 Speckled Sussex

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1 Buff Orpington

1 Silver Laced Wynedotte

1 Black Australorp

1 Delaware

1 Welsummer

1 Plymouth Barred Rock

1 Speckled Sussex

Reply
post #15 of 17

Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

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Rachel BB

Stem cell transplant from unrelated donor in Feb 2015. Thank you to all my friends here on BYC for all your support during my treatment and ongoing recovery!

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post #16 of 17

If I have too many, I scramble them for the birds and dogs.

 

I used to leave them on the counter, until my dogs caught on to me...I started putting them in the fridge.

"If there are no chickens in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went." 
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"If there are no chickens in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went." 
Reply
post #17 of 17
Glad to know I am not the only "crazy person" who stores eggs on my counter. People look at you pretty funny here in North America when they see that.
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