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23% Feed

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by bigredfeather, Nov 23, 2008.

  1. bigredfeather

    bigredfeather Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I went to get my second 50 lb bag of feed yesterday for my 26, almost 3 week old Cornish X chicks. The first bag I got was 21% protein, starter/grower which my feed mill grinds/ mixes themselves($9.20 per bag). I wanted a feed that was 23%-24%, I asked if they had anything higher. They told me they didn't. I know one guy that works there pretty well. He said I could add 7 lbs of soy meal to a bag, and that would get me near the percent I was looking for. They gave me the 7lbs of soy meal in a paper bag. When I got home, I dumped half the feed into my metal trash can and then put half the soy meal and mixed it well. Added the other half of both and mixed it well. Ta-Da! 23% feed. The best part was they only charged me $.77 more!
    For others out there looking for the smae thing, your local feed store may do the same for you. They should know how much to add to get to any % desired.
     
  2. greyfields

    greyfields Overrun With Chickens

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    Any seed meal will pump your protein %, since they are all around 40% protein. Around here, commonly available are soybean, linseed, canola and sometimes cottonseed meal.

    The real question, though, is why would you want to go over 23%? I bet if you raised the two groups side by side, there would be no difference in their weights/gain.
     
  3. bigredfeather

    bigredfeather Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm not trying to go over 23%. The feed comes w/ 21%, and I want to get to 23%. This feed is also medicated, which I really didn't like about it. I figured it wouldn't be so bad when the chicks were smaller. After this bag, I'm going to switch and maintain using the feed mills 18%, unmedicated. I will then add enough soy meal to make it 22%-23%. If they get too large, the last bag or so may need to be just the straight 18%. I'll wait and see.

    Is there anything wrong with this stradegy?
     
  4. adoptedbyachicken

    adoptedbyachicken Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

    Feeding high protein your going to increase your losses. They are far more likely to flip than if you let them grow a bit slower. You might find you have more leg issues too, although I persoanlly have not seen that.

    21% is good for the first 3 weeks then gradually down to 18% and process at 7 to 10 weeks is average plan.
     
  5. willheveland

    willheveland Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I always thought just the opposite.If your percentage is too low you will have leg problems.If it was to high it may be hard on their organs,I don't think 23% is too high.Most hatcheries suggest at least 21% for the cornish type meat birds.It's not to get bigger birds but to get stronger legs that will support bigger birds.The birds growth really takes off at 3-4 weeks so it needs it's legs beyond 3 weeks.I feed mine the same straight through.
    The only time I have had leg trouble is when I feed a lower %.People will disagree with this but I have taken birds that become soft on their legs,put them in a seperate cage and fed them a feed mix with a high boost of protein.Within a few days they are back on their feet.I have done this many times and it has saved me from culling a bird early. Will
     
  6. adoptedbyachicken

    adoptedbyachicken Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

    I have found that with turkeys for sure, and I have heard about it with cornish crosses but when I tried it while I had no leg issues the flip rate went up considerably. I stick with 21% which is chick starter with this feed mill, then go down after 3 or 4 weeks.

    I do the 26% for starter for the turkeys and go down to 23% at 7 weeks.
     
  7. greyfields

    greyfields Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote:I don't think the protein percentage is the culprit. The issue is more likely lack of calcium and other trace minerals while they grow. The birds are genetically 'programmged' to grow even in the face of nutritional shortages. I think that's when you have the issue with the bones growing too quickly and not strong enough.
     
  8. pdpatch

    pdpatch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    According to our vet most done problems can be traced to many or not enough trace mineral present. Each type of Poultry needs certain trace mineral to process calcium in there bodies. If the calcium and other trace minerals mix is incorrect they will develop problems with there bones, not just there legs.

    According to our vet the best defense against bone problems is use vietimans and minerals supplement in there water, and don't give them extra calcium when they are chick's.

    Tom
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2008
  9. willheveland

    willheveland Chillin' With My Peeps

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    When cornish have leg issues I was thinking it's a weakness due to a muscle problem(protein).The problems I have had in the past didn't seem like a bone problem(calcium).They had trouble getting around because of weak muscle not weak bones,in my opinon.That's why they recovered with the protein boost.

    I can understand what the vet said about the calcium in young chicks,I would guess that's why they suggest waiting for the eggs to come before switching to the layer mash with your egg producers. Will
     
  10. bigredfeather

    bigredfeather Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Good points and suggestions by all. It has at least given me some insight on the situation. I guess I will do my own expirementation to see what works best for me. My opinion is shared with Willheveland as far as they are going to grow fast due to their genetics, not by what is fed or how much. I am going to check the exact %'s of minerals and vitamins in the feed I am using, and then decide whether or not I should suppliment. I am keeping track of things I'm doing with this batch. If I do have any problems, I will try to correct them by doing something different on the next batch.
     

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