1. stargazingmommy

    stargazingmommy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 19, 2011
    Spokane
    I live in Spokane Wa. Right now we have 2 chickens and 2 ducks. We are allowed 1 per 2000 SF, our lot is 5400, so I guess our limit would be 2.
    We have a neighbor that has been causing all kinds of issues for us, including reporting that we are growing selling and using pot. House got searched, we got cleared on that charge. He stares at us through the cracks in the back fence(10 ft tall fence), that we can't fix because it's HIS fence, we offered. He complains if the sprinklers get his fence wet. He complains and tells us(demands) that we move our cars if they are any bit over the property line(extended out to the street, even though the street is public property so I can park anywhere it's legal to). Until he made the drug accusations we had done everything he asked, mainly because we are buying this house and have to live here, and I try to keep the peace.
    No more. I'm done with it. when he came over today and said "you need to move your car" I said I don't think so and slammed the door. I was in the garden later and heard him complaining to his wife about the chickens, so I'm sure there's a complaint coming regarding them soon. Animal control has recently been here to inspect my house as I got certified to foster for them, so I'm not majorly worried, they saw the chicks, the coop, the run, the lack of smell and how clean it was and commented on how healthy and happy they are. but I'm sure they will say something if pushed to by a complaint.
    So, I've been trying to come up with plans, alternatives, ideas so I don't panic if and when they come. In doing so I approached my teens with the possibility that we will have to get rid of 1, maybe two. I thought my 17 yr old was going to have a meltdown right there. Kim is schizophrenic and autistic. She is the one that pulled Tiki through when I was sure she would die, she is the one that slept next to the brooder every night and checked on them often to make sure they were warm enough. She is the one that they follow around. She will be devastated if we have to get rid of any.
    In talking to a coworker(we are both RN's) and telling her the situation, she suggested we have Kim's therapist and psychiatrist write notes and a prescription for them as therapy animals.
    How realistic is this idea?
    Has anyone here done that before?
    If it is feasible I would like to get started on it tomorrow before he has a chance to complain.
     
  2. calista

    calista Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 27, 2010
    Wow, you have a heavy load to carry, and I am so sorry about the possibility of removal of your pet chickens -- especially when your daughter has bonded with them and has her own disabilities to deal with. Living next to a neighbor-from-hell is an additional burden you shouldn't have to endure. (Are you SURE you want to buy this house and live next to this guy? Compromises and peaceful coexistence seem out of the question.) [​IMG]

    So many of the goals of the Delta Society concerning animal-assisted therapy seem tailor-made for your making a case for your hens as an integral part of her therapy. Maybe they've only considered cats and dogs up to this point, but you could contact them for help:

    http://www.deltasociety.org/Page.aspx?pid=320

    Here's another reference about the link between animal therapy and autism treatment:

    Animal treatment can reduce the blood pressure of autistic children and ease symptoms like headache, insomnia. Otherwise, people living with a pet have less lonely feelings. And the companion of animals could promote the foundation of healthy personality of children with autism, including trusting, respecting, contributing, self-confidence, commitment and responsibility. It also can teach children with autism problem-solving skills, decision- making skills, language and social skills.

    http://www.autism-world.com/index.php/2007/12/19/animal-theray-for-autism/

    And this is long professional report but might be worth your while to read through for ideas:

    http://www.menzies.org.au/Uploads/Animal-Assisted-Therapy-Report.pdf

    I am a firm believer in the power of positive publicity, so you might also explore enlisting your local radio or TV station in your cause, along with starting a Facebook page.

    Please let us know what happens. I hope some of this information helps you keep your daughter's "therapy chickens." [​IMG]
     
  3. stargazingmommy

    stargazingmommy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 19, 2011
    Spokane
    Tytyty for the ideas.
    The little changes I've seen in this kid are just amazing. 2 months ago I would have had to beg cry and threaten to get her out of the house for anything other than school. Tonight I had to take her sister somewhere ...she asked to go and take doctor (a duck). I saw her interacting with other kids, with her duck. She was talking to them without me with her. It took 15 yrs. To get her diagnosed, she's high functioning and girls are majorly under diagnosed anyway.
    She's learning responsibility for another dependent creature, something a little hard to learn from cats.
    I can't wait to share this with her therapist and doctor.
     
  4. Yay Chicks!

    Yay Chicks! Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 15, 2010
    Forest Grove, OR
    This will sound like semantics, but there is a difference between "therapy animals" and "companion animals." Therapy animals have to be certified, but companion animals can be whatever kind of pet helps the person manage their diagnosis. Under the ADA, you can often gain the right to have companion animals even in no-pet housing. Your child's psychiatrist should be aware of this and has probably advocated for other clients in this area. While it's usually a dog or cat, there's no real reason why it has to be limited to that.
     
  5. stargazingmommy

    stargazingmommy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 19, 2011
    Spokane
    Yay Chicks! :

    This will sound like semantics, but there is a difference between "therapy animals" and "companion animals." Therapy animals have to be certified, but companion animals can be whatever kind of pet helps the person manage their diagnosis. Under the ADA, you can often gain the right to have companion animals even in no-pet housing. Your child's psychiatrist should be aware of this and has probably advocated for other clients in this area. While it's usually a dog or cat, there's no real reason why it has to be limited to that.

    I do know the difference, just have been up 24 hrs and half brain dead right now.
    In the process of writing a letter to her therapist and doc, and anyone for that matter, outlining the changes that have occurred in her with these animals.​
     
  6. stargazingmommy

    stargazingmommy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 19, 2011
    Spokane
    And I guess ultimately it doesn't matter. I was just checking out the ADA website and rules. The most recent changes include this ": “Service animal means any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, This language simply clarifies the Department´s longstanding position."

    It also limits accepted psychiatric support animals to trained dogs.
    I have a quad friend that has a trained capuchin, which are now also excluded specifically as service animals.
     

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