A reason for more chickens; Eggs from small flocks linked with increased risk for salmonella

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Poultry Times, Feb 21, 2017.

  1. Yes

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. No

    8 vote(s)
    100.0%
  1. Poultry Times

    Poultry Times New Egg

    6
    0
    9
    Feb 21, 2017
    A study back in 2016 concluded that the smaller the flock, the higher the probability of salmonella in the eggs from the hens. The researchers took random samples from both large and small flocks from farmer's markets all around Pennsylvania.




    Edited by Staff
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 21, 2017
  2. Beer can

    Beer can Overrun With Chickens

    7,039
    3,801
    371
    Aug 12, 2014
    Upstate NY
    IDK, I have a small flock, usually around 15 laying sometimes as few as 6 and between 15 and 40 total birds depending on the time of yr. Never tested the eggs for salmonella, but I've ate them raw and never got sick so I'm pretty sure they're OK
    :D
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2017
  3. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener True BYC Addict

    20,249
    8,861
    596
    Nov 7, 2012
    CENTRAL MAINE
    I'd like to know who paid for that study. Smells pretty fishy to me. And without posting the study, it would be pretty difficult to assess the validity of it.
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2017
    1 person likes this.
  4. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

    35,810
    9,323
    656
    Nov 27, 2012
    SW Michigan
    My Coop
    Yes, please link study @Poultry Times

    Funny.... new member, 2 posts, both edited by staff.......me suspects subscription soliciting.
     
  5. Poultry Times

    Poultry Times New Egg

    6
    0
    9
    Feb 21, 2017
    The study is on poultry time's website, but I'll sum it up here. It was done by a professor at Penn State University. The flocks were all under 3000 birds and the researchers concluded that it was because coops under 3000 are not regulated by the government and may not follow certain cleaning protocol required by large corporations. A few requirements of the government are the following: intensive rodent control, cleaning and disinfecting between flocks, environmental monitoring of pullet and layer houses, continuous testing of eggs from any Salmonella-positive houses, and diverting eggs from Salmonella-positive houses for pasteurization.
     
  6. Poultry Times

    Poultry Times New Egg

    6
    0
    9
    Feb 21, 2017
    Yes, that was my original intention. I was not aware of the rules though I did try to find out before joining. I did post the link but it was removed. However, I will continue to post summaries of articles on here that are relevant to free-range chickens to inform people. Plus, it is interesting to see a new perspective on these stories as most of the feedback I usually receive is from large corporations.
     
  7. Poultry Times

    Poultry Times New Egg

    6
    0
    9
    Feb 21, 2017
    Yeah cooking them always kills it. But you've got to be careful because chickens can get salmonella too. Weird, huh?
     
  8. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener True BYC Addict

    20,249
    8,861
    596
    Nov 7, 2012
    CENTRAL MAINE
    Your data and test information is not pertinent to the back yard flock keeper. (IMO)
     
    1 person likes this.
  9. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Chicken Obsessed

    8,862
    3,912
    441
    Mar 15, 2010
    On the MN prairie.
    So, you're still talking about large operations compared to your typical backyard or farm flock...
     
  10. Poultry Times

    Poultry Times New Egg

    6
    0
    9
    Feb 21, 2017
    Why not? People here don't have more than 3,000 chickens, do they?
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by