Adding older birds to flock of young pullets and cockeral

theuglychick

Crowing
May 3, 2016
1,146
3,006
281
Louisiana
I've read a lot about integrating young pullets into an existing flock of older birds, but I have a question about doing the opposite.

I need to integrate three new birds that are 9 months to a year of age into my existing small flock of 13 young 4 week old pullets and one cockeral.

I know to quarantine the birds for one month on a separate part of the property where the birds will not be able to share airspace. During this time, I plan to deworm using Valbazen, mix in medicated feed to the layer ration to hopefully build some immunity to cocci, which I have dealt with already so I know it's in my coop, and treat for mites just to be safe.

My question is, what would be the best way to integrate these three older birds (purebred Ameraucanas) into my small and young mixed flock (consisting of light brahmas, andalusians, easter eggers, and cuckoo marans) at the end of the one month quarantine period?
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
8 Years
Nov 27, 2012
97,864
134,422
1,807
SW Michigan
My Coop
My Coop
It pretty much works the same way......
......the main issue with integration is always territoriality over space, food, and water.

Larger birds sometimes can have an advantage if it comes down to a serious brawl, but pecking order is often settled with more subtle forms of communication.
Just follow the same rules of an introduction period separate but adjacent enclosures for a few weeks after your quarantine....then lots of space, places to 'hide', and multiple feed/water stations when you finally let them share the same space.
 

theuglychick

Crowing
May 3, 2016
1,146
3,006
281
Louisiana
It pretty much works the same way......
......the main issue with integration is always territoriality over space, food, and water.

Larger birds sometimes can have an advantage if it comes down to a serious brawl, but pecking order is often settled with more subtle forms of communication.
Just follow the same rules of an introduction period separate but adjacent enclosures for a few weeks after your quarantine....then lots of space, places to 'hide', and multiple feed/water stations when you finally let them share the same space.


Great info! And thank you for the help. I've opted to not go with three mature birds, but with just 2 slightly older birds (older by about a month or so.)

Is my quarantine plan sufficient? Or is my deworming and de-licing plan over-kill? This is my first time introducing new birds in a long time and the last time I did it (years ago) I lost one of my older flock birds to some strange disease.
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
8 Years
Nov 27, 2012
97,864
134,422
1,807
SW Michigan
My Coop
My Coop
Quote: I've never quarantined birds...I replace stock with chicks hatched here and/or purchased day olds.
I also do not use any medication/treatments unless the need is positively ID'd.

Have only ever dealt with lice and scaly leg mites
(my first flock were adults who brought these things with them-lesson learned there)
for which I effectively used permethrin powder and bag balm respectively.

You'd have to decide how you want to handle medications/treaments.
You're being in the south could warrant more preventative/scheduled treatments and close attention to resistances.
I've read that worms and other pests can be much more prevalent in warmer climes than mine.
Main reason I like it up here, all (most) the bugs die come winter....haha!
 

theuglychick

Crowing
May 3, 2016
1,146
3,006
281
Louisiana
I've never quarantined birds...I replace stock with chicks hatched here and/or purchased day olds.
I also do not use any medication/treatments unless the need is positively ID'd.

Have only ever dealt with lice and scaly leg mites
(my first flock were adults who brought these things with them-lesson learned there)
for which I effectively used permethrin powder and bag balm respectively.

You'd have to decide how you want to handle medications/treaments.
You're being in the south could warrant more preventative/scheduled treatments and close attention to resistances.
I've read that worms and other pests can be much more prevalent in warmer climes than mine.
Main reason I like it up here, all (most) the bugs die come winter....haha!


You said it! We have everything here. I think since they're younger birds that I might just treat for mites and monitor closely during the separation. Thank you again!
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom