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Aggressive Roosters and Hens with no back feathers do Aprons work?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Chicks in Hill, Jan 3, 2010.

  1. Chicks in Hill

    Chicks in Hill New Egg

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    Jan 3, 2010
    Hill
    Hi! I am new to the chicken raising world and we have 4 hens and unfortunately 2 roosters (one a late bloomer - thought he was a she). The roosters (gray cochin and large Aracuna) are quite a bit larger than the hens especially a smallish game hen - totally featherless and the breeding activity especially as they are cooped up in this cold weather and snow is causing feather loss and bitten combs. I have seen advertisements for aprons and they seem like a good idea, but what about the chickens need to groom themselves? If you have used them, how often do they need to be changed? Should we get rid of the roosters or try different roosters next year?

    Please send me your advice or comments.
    Thanks
     
  2. BarkerChickens

    BarkerChickens Microbrewing Chickenologist

    Nov 25, 2007
    High Desert, CA
    The aprons are very helpful! I use them on my own hens. As for the roo issue. 2 hens per rooster is a bit tough on the hens. Usually 6-8 hens per roo is better. If you want to keep both roos, I recommend getting more hens. I have 28 hens and 2 roosters now and I still have a few hens that lose feathers (either roo favorites or they just give in to the roos too much). Roos are quite active in the male department and that few of hens give each hen little break. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2010
  3. Opa

    Opa Opa-wan Chickenobi

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    May 11, 2008
    Howell Michigan
    Unless you are wanting fertile eggs for hatching there is no need for a rooster. However, sometime a rooster can help protect your flock, in some situations, if you allow them to free range.
    If the hens are becoming "rooster worn" I would isolate the roosters or at the very least the worst damaged hens. I have 5 roosters of the breeds that I want for hatching. Currently each rooster is in his own indoor pen to prevent frostbite and I won't be placing them with hens until spring when they will be placed in breed specific pens. Once I have the requisite number of eggs the roosters will go back into isolation. A lot of additional hassle but it is the best way to keep you girls looking good.
    I don't have any experience with aprons but it is my understanding they work quite well.
     
  4. FortWorthChicks

    FortWorthChicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 21, 2009
    Fort Worth
    Chicken soup anyone?
     

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