aierial pred problem

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by chknfarm, Mar 10, 2013.

  1. chknfarm

    chknfarm New Egg

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    Mar 10, 2013
    latelely flock has been slimming due to hawk, owls taking heads off if not whole chicken. Flock has been in the neighborhood spread across few houses and growing since the 90s but lately been slimming. Hawk or hawks stop by in the morning looking for small chiks but theyre running out and starting to go after smaller hens. I can usually scare away with couple claps but soon returns flustered and desperate as i came within couple feet but he still manage to fly off to nearby pasture with one of the chiks. Had 2-3 headless hens and one rooster laying on yard each morning last week, was suspecting cat but caught owl flying off with a whole hen or rooster around 10pm one night. The chickens got accustomed to sleeping in trees away from dogs but its not them they need to worry about anymore. I work a nightshift so hard to keep an eye on them but sat night roosters were squaking all night long I could hear couple owls hooting back n forth through trees and what soounded like hawk or hawks screeching in nearby pasture where im sure they reside around 4-5am. An owl and hawk have been around here for a few years but im guessing they may have reproduced as theyre daily feeding and sounding multiple. IDK but any deterrents or maybe just bright *** light on the tree? I dont want to cage them but will if it keeps them safe. Theyre good about alarming when they see one hovering or in tree with them im just not home during week nights to fend them off and usually find signs of struggle be it headless or just feathers spread across yard. Anyway just thought id post since it looks like im not only one with this problem
     
  2. seminolewind

    seminolewind Flock Mistress Premium Member

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    I think if they're your chickens you need a safe pen for them and a safe coop for them at night. The problem is not going to go away unless you take care of them
     
  3. chknfarm

    chknfarm New Egg

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    Mar 10, 2013
    i was really just wondering if light has any effect on the owls? i know itll help the chickens see atleast something sneaking up on them but if itll help the owls too probably no good.. ive yet to see them in direct light and the trees arent lite at all. They were a neighbors that moved out we just kept feeding and they migrated over so guess they are my pets or w/e now. A hawk sits about 8 ft out one window could have sunk a pellet or paintball but after reading its illegel to harm ill leave them alone. Ill try a few things adding lights/blinking, trim trees and maybe build a night coop just didnt think it'd be a problem since our dogs and neighbors cats are chicken friendly. They naturally go up in the trees in the evening with a peacock and guineas that dont get messed with tho peacock sits on his own
     
  4. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    To falls ago I had a great-horned owl persicuting birds roosting on front porch. Even with front porch light on owl came. Only thing besides me standing on guard which was not for sleep was leaving front door open so dog (pup at time) would stay near front door. When owl called dog persicuted owl which I had to promote at first but dog quickly got into it. All said, lights did not repell owl nor help birds since they really had no place to go and seem unable to fight great-horned owls at night.
     
  5. chickengeorgeto

    chickengeorgeto Overrun With Chickens

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    The only thing I know that helps with owl problems (except for the demise of the owl) is flashing red lights aimed skyward. this keeps the owls eyes from properly adjusting to the low light conditions of the night time roost and supposedly this makes it harder but not impossible for the owl to pick out a target.
     

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