Alpha Rooster is dead, flock is acting ODD!

JedJackson

Crossing the Road
5 Years
Jul 6, 2016
7,240
22,110
942
NW Washington state
Jefferson and Bruno were both part of our first group of chicks we got from a hatchery. All our different aged chicks are from the hatchery as well. So no genes are getting passed around here 😅. It might be a lost cause but I'm going to still keep working with Bruno. I'm unfortunately very fond of him. If I get another rooster, I definitely want an older one from a flock!
That's up to you. If Bruno attacks people, then the best bet is to make it so he can't get to them, especially children. You also might do a search on here for posts that deal with ways to change human aggressive roosters. There are some and it is worth a shot.
 
Nov 11, 2020
1,622
2,778
286
West Virginia
Jefferson and Bruno were both part of our first group of chicks we got from a hatchery. All our different aged chicks are from the hatchery as well. So no genes are getting passed around here 😅. It might be a lost cause but I'm going to still keep working with Bruno. I'm unfortunately very fond of him. If I get another rooster, I definitely want an older one from a flock!
List of breeders in your state Ameraucana (eggs,chicks and adults)You may find a 1 yr old rooster raised w/hens and a rooster in this directory.2nd column (highlighted in tan)
AB means they ship adult birds
 

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Nov 11, 2020
1,622
2,778
286
West Virginia
Ok so over a month ago my husband culled one of our roosters due to aggression. Ever since then, the pullets (6 month old) have been acting strange. There is still another rooster for them, but it doesn't seem to matter. All of them stopped laying the day after Jefferson was culled. Since then only two have resumed laying. Also, the previously docile beta rooster is now the only rooster and is not docile anymore. Is this normal behavior?
Moving the coop and chickens was a move in the right direction .Keeping the chickens separated from everyone will prevent Bruno from becoming overprotective and anxious but theres a lot of stress there in the flock now that they're contained.Be watchful of him because the hens can trigger him too. They aren't used to being contained and will lilkely hover around you soon as you enter the run. I would go in there as little as possible for at least 4 weeks. I hope for his sake it all works out. Your family needs a break from all this rooster drama! Hope momma and baby are doing well today!
 
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OzarkChooks

Songster
Premium Feather Member
Jul 12, 2021
246
715
186
Moving the coop and chickens was a move in the right direction .Keeping the chickens separated from everyone will prevent Bruno from becoming overprotective and anxious but theres a lot of stress there in the flock now that they're contained.Be watchful of him because the hens can trigger him too. They aren't used to being contained and will lilkely hover around you soon as you enter the run. I would go in there as little as possible for at least 4 weeks. I hope for his sake it all works out. Your family needs a break from all this rooster drama! Hope momma and baby are doing well today!
Thank you 😊
Between not hand feeding Bruno and raising my arms in the air (I feel ridiculous doing this) Bruno has stopped running up to me when I enter their pen. He doesn't even get up close to me anymore. Previously he would run up and stand on my boots.

I think more hens are laying than I thought. I have a broody hen who I had originally given 3 eggs to hatch. I don't mess with her usually but this morning i peeked in her box while she was out and she is sitting on an enormous pile of eggs. I think the other hens must be laying there when she leaves to eat. I don't know what to do with all of them. So I am unsure now how many hens are laying. Apparently I am going to be having a lot of chicks 😳
 
Nov 11, 2020
1,622
2,778
286
West Virginia
Thank you 😊
Between not hand feeding Bruno and raising my arms in the air (I feel ridiculous doing this) Bruno has stopped running up to me when I enter their pen. He doesn't even get up close to me anymore. Previously he would run up and stand on my boots.

I think more hens are laying than I thought. I have a broody hen who I had originally given 3 eggs to hatch. I don't mess with her usually but this morning i peeked in her box while she was out and she is sitting on an enormous pile of eggs. I think the other hens must be laying there when she leaves to eat. I don't know what to do with all of them. So I am unsure now how many hens are laying. Apparently I am going to be having a lot of chicks 😳
I can't wait to see Brunos offspring!They should be beautiful!
 

TxMesteth

In the Brooder
Sep 17, 2019
6
6
18
Waving your arms is only a temporary solution and could wind up making him worse once he figures it out. The more you scare or challenge them, which is what you are doing, they will become three times worse pretty soon. You have to immediately catch them and holding their back down with one hand and their head pushed down to the ground until they completely relax their bodies for a few minutes submitting to you, just like they do at the end of a fight with another bird. It has to happen for a couple of weeks when they first start, and everyone in the family that they attack or threaten has to do it or it won’t work. It is a pain, but you can’t let them get away with it not even a few times, even if your in a hurry to get somewhere, you have to stop and do it. You can help hold him done with the kids, but they need to tell him he is a bad bird while doing it. I have had aggressive roosters that were dangerous that had sons that were dangerous and sons that were the gentlest roosters I’ve ever had, so it is not a genetic thing per say. Good luck.
 
Nov 11, 2020
1,622
2,778
286
West Virginia
Waving your arms is only a temporary solution and could wind up making him worse once he figures it out. The more you scare or challenge them, which is what you are doing, they will become three times worse pretty soon. You have to immediately catch them and holding their back down with one hand and their head pushed down to the ground until they completely relax their bodies for a few minutes submitting to you, just like they do at the end of a fight with another bird. It has to happen for a couple of weeks when they first start, and everyone in the family that they attack or threaten has to do it or it won’t work. It is a pain, but you can’t let them get away with it not even a few times, even if your in a hurry to get somewhere, you have to stop and do it. You can help hold him done with the kids, but they need to tell him he is a bad bird while doing it. I have had aggressive roosters that were dangerous that had sons that were dangerous and sons that were the gentlest roosters I’ve ever had, so it is not a genetic thing per say. Good luck.
We never were aggressive with any of our roosters and they weren't aggressive with us. We did not grab them and hold them down like this and I wouldn't recommend it done to them. It frightens them to be picked up and held and raises their heart rate.They submit not out of respect but fear.
 

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