***An idea for raising humidity!***Pic heavy

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Farmer Kitty, Apr 4, 2008.

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  1. Farmer Kitty

    Farmer Kitty Flock Mistress

    Sep 18, 2007
    Wisconsin
    A friend's neighbor came up with this idea. It works well for those who leave the eggs in the turner or egg carton and fills up the extra spots so the chicks don't get caught in them.

    1. Get an egg.
    [​IMG]
    2. Poke a hole in one end.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    3. Take stir the contents.
    [​IMG]
    4. Empty the egg.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    5. Rinse the egg out. I would also suggest cooking it to kill the bacteria.

    6. Hold in a bowl of water until full.
    [​IMG]
    7. Place in bator.

    Use as many as you need to get the humidity up and you can adjust the hole size to help with the humidity too!
     
  2. Alleyoops25

    Alleyoops25 Chillin' With My Peeps

    722
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    May 14, 2007
    Colorado
    WOW what a great idea there farmer kitty!!!![​IMG] [​IMG] sounds better than sponges.
     
  3. RioLindoAz

    RioLindoAz Sleeping

    Jul 8, 2007
    Yuma, Arizona
    Thats a cool incubator decoration!!!
     
  4. twigg

    twigg Cooped up

    Mar 2, 2008
    Tulsa
    It's an interesting idea, but unfortunately, by far the biggest factor in raising humidity is surface area.

    The whole concept relies on water evaporating, and this becomes harder to acheive the higher the RH becomes.

    This is one very good reason for using forced air incubators ... Humidity is MUCH easier to control.
     
  5. Farmer Kitty

    Farmer Kitty Flock Mistress

    Sep 18, 2007
    Wisconsin
    My friend just used this idea and had very good luck! You can make the hole size bigger even take the top of the egg off!
     
  6. twigg

    twigg Cooped up

    Mar 2, 2008
    Tulsa
    Quote:I see that, and as I said, the idea is interesting.

    Stop for a moment and consider though the area of the trays that GQF provide to control the humidity effectively. You will see that you would have to fill the egg turner with *water eggs* to provide similar results.

    I am not knocking the idea, just questioning it's practicality, thermodynamics being what they are [​IMG]

    I have no idea why your friend had good results, I do not know the ambient conditions, or what controls were used to compare. I am just saying that this idea has practical limitations, and that folk should consider these limitations along with the idea.

    On the other hand, we learn something from every experiment, and I, for one, am glad to see so many ideas posted.

    Keep up the good work.
     
  7. Alleyoops25

    Alleyoops25 Chillin' With My Peeps

    722
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    May 14, 2007
    Colorado
    Quote:I see that, and as I said, the idea is interesting.

    Stop for a moment and consider though the area of the trays that GQF provide to control the humidity effectively. You will see that you would have to fill the egg turner with *water eggs* to provide similar results.

    I am not knocking the idea, just questioning it's practicality, thermodynamics being what they are [​IMG]

    I have no idea why your friend had good results, I do not know the ambient conditions, or what controls were used to compare. I am just saying that this idea has practical limitations, and that folk should consider these limitations along with the idea.

    On the other hand, we learn something from every experiment, and I, for one, am glad to see so many ideas posted.

    Keep up the good work.

    Her friend had good results with the hatch because of th eggs. The idea has mor practicality than a sponge. THis freind has all the bells and whistles for th bator and the humidity was right on target. And since some people dont remove the egg try in the bator it works to keep chicks from falling through the trays holes, and getting stuck. You put the eggs withthe water in, and since the temp. is high it evaporates the water, ther by increasing the humidity.sponges are usually to big, and are more of a nusense than placing a egg full of water in some of the empty holes. The idea is a great idea, and is very practical. I know the woman farmerkitty posted this thread before. She lives in a area that has no humidity, so its not like she's incubating in a rain forest. a couple eggs can hold as much water as on sponge does, this has ben tested. And you can make the holes bigger if you need to increase the humidity, or youu can just add some more eggs. And if you have a bator like mine with alot of different guages thermometers, and water wigglers you need all the extra room you can get, I to am not trying to be mean but i am trying to show you the practicality of the idea.This has been used before and it does work pretty good. So some one might rather have a few small eggs in the tray and out of the way, rather than a sponge that takes a lot of space, and sits in ther breeding harmful bacteria the could cuase the chicks t get sick and die.
     
  8. wilds of pa

    wilds of pa Chillin' With My Peeps

    One thing that helps keep your hum right is to check the incubating rooms hum, we always have a Humidifier running in our incubating room. We keep our hum in the room at around 50%.
    With the Humidifier running it helps keep the hum in the bator from evaporating so quikly.
    With it still cold here and are furnace is running we always have dry air in the house. so this will help with hum problems in dry incubating rooms.
    twigg you are right,
    Also i think leaving the turner in the incubator is not a smart idea, I wouldnt even think of doing that. We always lay are eggs on there sides for hatching. I cant see good results from leaving the turner in the bator. Id be affraid there be some broken legs or even deaths. After all the time at trying to help the chicks incubate properply, why would you leave a turner in there to make things harder for the chicks to hatch and possibly be killed or hurt?

    As for the egg filled with water in for hum, dont think it will work, i know, id rather a spong, after hatching for more than 6 years we've had are ups and downs....surface area is the key.........



    But i quess everybody has to live and learne, Just my 2 cents
    Charlie
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2008
  9. twigg

    twigg Cooped up

    Mar 2, 2008
    Tulsa
    You put the eggs withthe water in, and since the temp. is high it evaporates the water, ther by increasing the humidity.sponges are usually to big, and are more of a nusense than placing a egg full of water in some of the empty holes. The idea is a great idea, and is very practical.

    This isn't true, I'm sorry, I hate to be argumentative.

    I do not dispute the results your friend obtained. However, I have no way of checking all the factors influencing the hatches.

    What I do know, is that the water will NOT evaporate from these eggs, even if you cut the top off, in the way it will evaporate from the enormous surface area created by a sponge.

    Your friend apparently acheived a great result, but I am highly skeptical that this idea contributed much, the laws of physics are kinda getting in the way.

    ymmv​
     
  10. twigg

    twigg Cooped up

    Mar 2, 2008
    Tulsa
    ps ... there you have it Members ... two opinions ....

    *take what you need, and leave the rest*
     
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