Anyone rescue a rooster from a bad home?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by texas hiker, Sep 23, 2013.

  1. texas hiker

    texas hiker Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 22, 2009
    East Texas
    My wife and I were given a rooster that had been in a bad home. Not bad as in fighting, the people who had the rooster were older and unable to care for their flock. They were giving their chickens away, my wife and I wanted a rooster, so we took one.

    The rooster is some kind of crossbreed, it is small with a red body and black tail feathers.

    The rooster is not socialized to being around people. The elderly couple were unable to spend time with the flock.

    The rooster is rather skinny as the owners were unable to feed the flock a steady supply of feed. He will probably fatten up quick since my wife and I keep the hens with laying pellets, free range and table scraps.

    I slipped the rooster into the chicken house last night. A few minutes after being in the house the rooster worked his way to the middle of the hens, then he started making cooing/purring sounds. The hens moved in close around the rooster.

    This morning there was no fighting, but I had to leave to go to work.

    There are 12 hens and the rooster. They have free range on several acres of land, so the are not bunched in close to each other.

    The rooster did not act aggressive when being handled.

    Before introducing the rooster into the flock my wife and I used pruning shears to cut the roosters spurs. The spur bled a little bit, but I did not want the rooster hurting the hens.

    The flight feathers were also cut on one of the roosters wings. The hens do not have their wings clipped.

    Besides diseases from the other flock, and lack of socialization, what kind of other problems are my wife and I looking at?
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2013
  2. Sjisty

    Sjisty Scribe of Brahmalot

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    May 18, 2009
    Brooksville
    Well, hopefully the rooster doesn't have any illnesses or diseases that he will pass to your girls, since you didn't quarantine him. Other than that, I think you will enjoy the interaction of him with yours girls and it will be gratifying to be able to watch him flourish with good food and good care.
     
  3. texas hiker

    texas hiker Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 22, 2009
    East Texas
    I hope the purring cooing sounds he started making last night were a good sign.

    As the girls existed the chicken house this morning the rooster suddenly found himself alone in a new place. He started making all kinds of noise. I think he was trying to call to the girls.
     
  4. dandrews1971

    dandrews1971 Chillin' With My Peeps

    We didnt take a roo from a bad home, but did rescue one from a shelter. We have a flock of 14 hens & 4 other roos (some were supposed to be hens...lol). When we got him, he had a HORRIBLE case of scaly leg mites & was underweight. We did quarantine for about a month, during whichj I aggressively treated the leg mites. We used Ivermectin & smeared the legs with vaseline. It seems to have worked, his legs are healed up, still a bit rough but as bad as it was, Im impressed they came this far back. given more time & good food, I think hell be 100% in a bit. He is a bantam roo, reddish body with black & green tail feathers, some spotting on the underside & feathered legs, pretty boy.
    he has integrated himself in the flock & does his darndest to mount my full size girls. He just sort of slides off & never manages to actually get anywhere. He thinks he is though! Quite funny to watch him!
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2013
  5. dandrews1971

    dandrews1971 Chillin' With My Peeps

    [​IMG]
    This is Napoleon.
     

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