Are Non-Hatchery Polish........

Bantimna

Songster
10 Years
Sep 29, 2009
5,089
23
241
South Africa
I've dug another pit for myself
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I have always loved the way Polish look, and their cute-ness
Now, what I need to know is:

Are Non-Hatchery Polish good-layers?
How are their temps.?
Around kids?
Confinement?
How is/was your experince with them
Would you reccomend them.
 

chickenlover54

Henely Hatchery
10 Years
May 20, 2009
2,746
44
199
Northern Illinois
I've never had Polish in seperate pens to know how their laying is, they have been mixed in the flock, I have to say though is it easy to get Polish in South Africa?
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becky3086

Crested Crazy
11 Years
Oct 14, 2008
3,627
38
211
Thomson, GA
No Polish lay well.
For the most part, they are very mild birds and not aggressive.
Bear confinement well.
I happen to love my Polish and have never had a problem with them.
 

asher

Chicken Enabler Extraordinaire
14 Years
Jan 26, 2007
3,479
62
351
Mountains of NC
My Polish never laid well. They were fine with confinement and their temperaments were fine, if not subdued/cautious (I think due to the crests and not being able to see.)
 

Crunchie

Brook Valley Farm
12 Years
Mar 1, 2007
1,367
8
181
Maryland
My large fowl Polish are some of the best layers on the farm--better than my Marans, and just as good as my Ameraucanas--when they are laying. Mine take long winter breaks and tend to have long molts. But I get nearly an egg a day during their "busy season."
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My bantams are less reliable in the laying department. I've had good temperaments and bad, but mostly good (just a couple of moody roosters). I don't find them flighty, though yes, they will startle if you surprise them--but can you blame them, if they didn't see you coming?
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The fact that they can't see you coming from behind/above makes them nice & easy to catch, which is a plus in my book. If you can't/don't free range, they are a good choice--they don't free range well, and do just fine in confinement. I know folks who do free range, but it is usually best to trim the crest feathers if you do this, to give them a clearer field of vision. I don't free range mine at all, I never have good luck with this. They end up scattered in every-which-direction all over the farm, lost and miserable, sitting ducks for hawks and other predators.
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They don't always do well with other breeds, as they tend to get picked on. Those crests are often too tempting for other chickens. Their crests are also an easy place for lice & mite infestations to go unseen, and it takes some vigilance to make sure bugs don't become a problem.

Anyway, I personally recommend them if you plan to keep them confined and can separate them from other breeds if picking becomes a problem. I find that they do require a little more maintenance than some other breeds but, for me, the good outweighs the bad. They are seriously entertaining birds to have around!

You need some.
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Boggy Bottom Bantams

Crowing
11 Years
Mar 9, 2008
7,401
136
288
Hahira, GA
Quote:
I agree fully with that, all my bantam polish and various other bantam crested breeds are great layers (egg a day for the most part), temps, love being in their pens (a plus for their safety, they cant see well) They do not set at all hardly, I have only had one go broody, and just for 2 weeks, but I like that, I sell eggs and chicks off them, so a broody hens cuts into that. Really nothing bad to say about them
 

CrestedHorizonPoultry

Songster
9 Years
Feb 21, 2010
137
5
109
Missouri
Quote:
Yes, they are good layers. Mine lay as much as my other breeds. I would have hens around kids but the cocks can be a bit territorial, esp. if confined. I really enjoy them but you just have to be educated and yes I would recommend them.
 

farmgirl77

In the Brooder
10 Years
Sep 10, 2009
74
0
39
great layers. free range though is like herding cats. drives my husband crazy.
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Hozer

Songster
10 Years
Feb 14, 2009
126
1
121
Homer, Alaska
I was given a couple pollish banties as a rescue and a couple of months after they settled in they began to lay a little white egg. The eggs started out small and I am sure they were young pullets. They lay quite well and it is rare I don't get at least one medium sized white egg a day...often 2. I would say I get about 4 eggs a week from each one. I'm talking mid-winter in Alaska. No doubt they are hatchery stock. It is cool to see a white egg that has a thick shell as opposed those anoemic "store boughten" eggs.

Mine are a little spooky and at the bottom of the pecking order. They are not super friendly and certainly not mean. They are cute little girls with their poofy hairdoos bobbing around. Not the brightest bulb in the circuit. If you are looking for a mixed basket, it is a good way to add white eggs.
 

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