Are there over the counter antibiotics available for chickens?

oregonkat

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My hen underwent crop surgery yesterday and this morning she is very hot. Is there an over the counter 'something' I can get to give her, antibiotic or something else? We do not have a chicken vet here, surgery was done by me and my neighbor. Surgery went very well, clean and tidy but I am worried about her now.
 

Eggcessive

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You can buy some online from fish or bird product sites, such as FishMox (amoxicillin) and others. In feed stores you can still get an injectable penicillin (procaine penicillin G,) but others were mostly made prescription only in 2017. If using the injectable procaine penG, give 1/4 ml daily into the breast muscle for 4-5 days in a row. Use a 20 gauge needle since it is thick, and insert it only 1/4 inch, so shorter needles are preferred. If you have a regular vet who knows you well, they might sell you some oral antibiotics where you could get a good broad spectrum one, such as Baytril or Clavamox.
 

oregonkat

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Oct 5, 2012
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Southern Oregon
You can buy some online from fish or bird product sites, such as FishMox (amoxicillin) and others. In feed stores you can still get an injectable penicillin (procaine penicillin G,) but others were mostly made prescription only in 2017. If using the injectable procaine penG, give 1/4 ml daily into the breast muscle for 4-5 days in a row. Use a 20 gauge needle since it is thick, and insert it only 1/4 inch, so shorter needles are preferred. If you have a regular vet who knows you well, they might sell you some oral antibiotics where you could get a good broad spectrum one, such as Baytril or Clavamox.
Thank you, Eggcessive. Vets here will not treat chickens unfortunately so I will try at my local grange coop and see what they have to offer.
 

Eggcessive

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Hope you find something. Let us know how it goes. For the future, it helps to Google fishmox, to possible have some in stock for any other problems. Antibiotics should not be overused, especially if you don’t know what is wrong, but sometimes they can save a life. The same amoxicillin can be used on other animals, such as dogs as well.

Are you giving fluids to your chicken yet?
 

oregonkat

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Hope you find something. Let us know how it goes. For the future, it helps to Google fishmox, to possible have some in stock for any other problems. Antibiotics should not be overused, especially if you don’t know what is wrong, but sometimes they can save a life. The same amoxicillin can be used on other animals, such as dogs as well.

Are you giving fluids to your chicken yet?
She is actually doing really well. She slurped down some watered down yoghurt and egg yolk this morning and I could hear gurgling and bubbling in her crop. She is preening but I set her up with a kind of crop sling made out of one of my son's trampoline socks (he's going to be thrilled with me:oops:) I cut off the toe and split the sides open so the top of the sock sits loosely around her neck and the body of the sock covers the crop and goes over her back with her wings through the slits (yes, she is very thin). She cannot get to the incision this way as I was worried she would cannibalize it if she could reach it. The crop itself is on the warm side but it is pink and not bruised looking as I thought it might be. She has access to water with vitamins in it in the dog crate but I have not seen her take any. Should I force her to have some with a syringe? Thanks for the interest.
 

oregonkat

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Here is kind of a disgusting pic of what we pulled out of her!
IMG_8138.JPG
 

Eggcessive

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Wow, that was a lot of gunk. You did well on the surgery. Did you use sutures or superglue?

I would hold a small measuring scoop of water up to her beak, and dip her beak a time or two if needed to get some water. If you can put the food and water right in front of her in the chicken sling where she can reach it, that would be great. Sounds like you have a good handle on things.
 

oregonkat

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I'm so glad to hear she's doing better!
Did you ever find antibiotics?

For my learning, could you tell me how you did surgery?
The only antibiotics available here are the injectable kind of penicillin and interestingly when I spoke to the chicken lady at my local grange she told me a couple of things that I did not know: chickens run at a very hot temp normally, between 102 and 105 degs. so it made sense that my hen felt hot to me and because of this high temp, bacterial infections usually have a hard time taking hold. She recommended continuing with the watery yogurt and egg yolk along with some soft scrambled egg to build up the good flora in her gut which the antibiotics would also kill. I have held off on giving her any drugs as she seems to be doing well aside from walking backwards in an attempt to rid herself of her sock bandage/bra.
The surgery was surprisingly easy. Make sure you have two people, this would be very hard on your own but I know folks have done it. Make sure you have all the bits and pieces ready: scalpel, bottle of betadine, lidocaine, cotton swabs, clean water and a syringe for flushing the crop and some pincers or tweezers for getting all the stuff out, and preferably some sutures and a hemostat. We used Vetbond adhesive but it was quite tricky to get both the crop and then the outer skin cleanly reattached, sutures would have easier and without the potential of splitting away.

Place a nice clean sock over the hens head so she cant see and freak out, they become quite docile at this point. You may have to cut away feathers around the incision area, we did not as her crop was naked. Clean the area really well with the betadine and then apply the lidocaine cream and wait for several minutes to deaden the area a bit. Make the incision going from the top of the crop down about an inch and a half. I know some folks do the incision like a smiley face across the crop but this seems counter intuitive to me as the wound would constantly be pulling against gravity to heal so we went the other way. Cut through the skin first and then through the crop, remove debris with pincers make sure you have a syringe or turkey baster with clean water to flush all the remaining goo and yellow liquid out of the crop. When done, seal the interior wound and then the exterior wound, clean everything again with betadine and make sure the hen cannot get to the wound by inventing some kind of bra or sling. Have this ready before you start the surgery so you can just slip her into it. Chickens heal amazingly quickly so the wound should be healed up completely in a couple of days. Voila!!! This is not for the faint of heart however, the stuff, as you can see above, is pretty disgusting and there is blood involved. Not much but enough to cause alarm if not prepared.
 

oregonkat

Crowing
7 Years
Oct 5, 2012
2,003
2,827
377
Southern Oregon
Wow, that was a lot of gunk. You did well on the surgery. Did you use sutures or superglue?

I would hold a small measuring scoop of water up to her beak, and dip her beak a time or two if needed to get some water. If you can put the food and water right in front of her in the chicken sling where she can reach it, that would be great. Sounds like you have a good handle on things.
She has water in with her, and I did give her a spoonful last night which she had a sip or two of. I am not too worried as there is a lot of water with her yoghurt egg slop that she is eating very well.

We used Vetbond adhesive but I think if I was to do this again I would use sutures just for the insurance of not having the wound pull open.
 

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