Australorp sexing

LaurasLorps

In the Brooder
8 Years
Apr 19, 2011
59
0
39
Arkansas
Hi, I am a first timer with 4 australorp chicks. They are only a week old, so I know I have a while before I can know for sure what sex my chicks are, but I was wondering what kind of things I could be looking for. I've read things about looking for how fast they feather, how thick their legs are or what color their comb is. But I am not sure which are just old wives' tales and which are reliable methods. Any help our guidance would be appreciated!
 

pastrymama

Songster
9 Years
Apr 30, 2010
995
20
143
Phoenix
I bought australorp chicks last summer, supposed to be all pullets. Well, I could tell by 2 weeks that "one of these things was not like the others". He was not feathering as fast, didn't grow a tail, but grew a big ole' comb! I think it's easier to tell if you have a few to compare to. I think I had 4 of them, sadly 2 of which my dog ate but left me with the roo. Figures. You will see soon enough if there is a roo in the mix.
 

TwoCrows

Inuit Raven
Staff member
Premium member
8 Years
Mar 21, 2011
38,983
46,003
1,362
New Mexico, USA
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At that age, it is just too early to tell gender yet. And none of those "old wives tales" things work on chicks. But with Australorps, many times the males will show signs early on, especially around 5 and 6 weeks. The combs and wattles will really start to grow and redden. The legs will thicken up. Since you have 4 chicks you can compare them to each other and while each one of them will mature at different rates, the males will develop much different from the females. Sometimes females do grow out feathers faster than males and females will even spar with each other.

This is all general and is not always true however and sometimes you just have to wait til it either crows or lays an egg. At about 5 or 6 weeks, watch the comb area. The females combs should stay dainty and only pale up. No big red combs or wattles.

You will love this breed, they can be real sweet hearts. Hope this info helped.
 

TwoCrows

Inuit Raven
Staff member
Premium member
8 Years
Mar 21, 2011
38,983
46,003
1,362
New Mexico, USA
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My Coop
At that age, it is just too early to tell gender yet. And none of those "old wives tales" things work on chicks. But with Australorps, many times the males will show signs early on, especially around 5 and 6 weeks. The combs and wattles will really start to grow and redden. The legs will thicken up. Since you have 4 chicks you can compare them to each other and while each one of them will mature at different rates, the males will develop much different from the females. Sometimes females do grow out feathers faster than males and females will even spar with each other.

This is all general and is not always true however and sometimes you just have to wait til it either crows or lays an egg. At about 5 or 6 weeks, watch the comb area. The females combs should stay dainty and only pale up. No big red combs or wattles.

You will love this breed, they can be real sweet hearts. Hope this info helped.
 

TwoCrows

Inuit Raven
Staff member
Premium member
8 Years
Mar 21, 2011
38,983
46,003
1,362
New Mexico, USA
My Coop
My Coop
At that age, it is just too early to tell gender yet. And none of those "old wives tales" things work on chicks. But with Australorps, many times the males will show signs early on, especially around 5 and 6 weeks. The combs and wattles will really start to grow and redden. The legs will thicken up. Since you have 4 chicks you can compare them to each other and while each one of them will mature at different rates, the males will develop much different from the females. Sometimes females do grow out feathers faster than males and females will even spar with each other.

This is all general and is not always true however and sometimes you just have to wait til it either crows or lays an egg. At about 5 or 6 weeks, watch the comb area. The females combs should stay dainty and only pale up. No big red combs or wattles.

You will love this breed, they can be real sweet hearts. Hope this info helped.
 

NoSleepTillBrooklyn

In the Brooder
8 Years
Mar 17, 2011
62
0
39
I've been going through the same thing, check out my link to my pics:

https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=489434&p=1

The most reliable thing I can say now (hindsight being what it is!) is that Mindy (now Mork) had the shorter tail, and was slower to feather out. I had never heard that was a "roo" thing until I started noticing Mindy's tail was pointy and she would actually roost her sister into the coop at night. Also Mindy was the first one to greet us, earlier friendliness and curiosity are roo traits. The comb isn't drastically different on mine, which is why it's been so hard to figure out. But these differences came about 8-9 weeks along.

Hope that helps, and I will parrot what the poster said about them being sweet and awesome. I've already left a message for 2 more! Have to make up for losing Mindy this week.

Best of luck!!
 

JodyJo

Songster
9 Years
Sep 27, 2010
2,786
41
188
Colorado
Quote:Here are a few pics of my Austrlorps...they were supposed to have been pullets, they were all roos....




there are some BR roos in there also






hope this helps a bit....ALL ROOS!
 

motherhenfran

In the Brooder
5 Years
Jul 25, 2014
83
1
41
@JodyJo that's so many Roos!! I know this thread is rather old but what did you end up doing with all your boys?
 
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