Back in Bresse!

FoodFreedomNow

Crowing
5 Years
Aug 11, 2016
3,803
4,507
452
Well, almost. I'm technically counting chicks before they hatch, but am feeling pretty confident I'll have some running around in just a few more days. 😁

This is my second round of raising this breed - I had them previously and experienced a number of unexpected issues that I think may have been attributable to inbreeding depression. With GFF's 2017 import, am hoping the gene pool is a bit deeper now and that I'll be raising them for many years to come.
 

Sequel

Enabler
6 Years
Feb 17, 2015
5,080
26,930
1,047
Kitsap County, Western Washington
Well, almost. I'm technically counting chicks before they hatch, but am feeling pretty confident I'll have some running around in just a few more days. 😁

This is my second round of raising this breed - I had them previously and experienced a number of unexpected issues that I think may have been attributable to inbreeding depression. With GFF's 2017 import, am hoping the gene pool is a bit deeper now and that I'll be raising them for many years to come.
That’s great! When you raised them last time I assume you ate them. I’m curious about the table quality and whether you followed the French finishing method. I’m sort of a Francophile as well as a chicken lover! :gig
 

FoodFreedomNow

Crowing
5 Years
Aug 11, 2016
3,803
4,507
452
@Sequel, yes, I did raise the cockerels for meat. And when I process my "standard" dual-purpose cockerels now, I fondly remember how easy the AB were to handle, pluck, and how meaty they were in comparison (especially the breasts).

I didn't follow the traditional French finishing method, but did offer a bit more fermented grain along with fermented feed (21% protein) as they grew out on pasture.

It's been a while since I've eaten Bresse, but I recall the meat being juicy and more mildly-flavored than the dual-purpose breeds I currently raise on pasture. As someone who has eaten and enjoys wild game, I don't consider my dual-purpose birds to taste "gamey", but people used to eating CornishX probably would. 😁

I plan to raise crosses, too. AB hens are good layers and will join my layer flock. This is - when the genetics are good - an outstanding dual-purpose breed and particularly well-suited to homesteading purposes, IMO. Looking forward to flock 2.0!
 

Sequel

Enabler
6 Years
Feb 17, 2015
5,080
26,930
1,047
Kitsap County, Western Washington
@Sequel, yes, I did raise the cockerels for meat. And when I process my "standard" dual-purpose cockerels now, I fondly remember how easy the AB were to handle, pluck, and how meaty they were in comparison (especially the breasts).

I didn't follow the traditional French finishing method, but did offer a bit more fermented grain along with fermented feed (21% protein) as they grew out on pasture.

It's been a while since I've eaten Bresse, but I recall the meat being juicy and more mildly-flavored than the dual-purpose breeds I currently raise on pasture. As someone who has eaten and enjoys wild game, I don't consider my dual-purpose birds to taste "gamey", but people used to eating CornishX probably would. 😁

I plan to raise crosses, too. AB hens are good layers and will join my layer flock. This is - when the genetics are good - an outstanding dual-purpose breed and particularly well-suited to homesteading purposes, IMO. Looking forward to flock 2.0!
Ok I’m following this thread! Good luck!
 

FoodFreedomNow

Crowing
5 Years
Aug 11, 2016
3,803
4,507
452
Probably Marans, New Hampshire, and maybe even Easter and Olive Eggers. I'm interested in developing a fast-growing, meaty bird that also lays colorful eggs. And bonus points for personality. 😁
 

FoodFreedomNow

Crowing
5 Years
Aug 11, 2016
3,803
4,507
452
Better late than never, right? These guys are a couple of days shy of 2 weeks old now, and are growing like weeds. Crops are always very full! Pic is about a week old.
PXL_20211102_122720583.PORTRAIT~2.jpg
 

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