Bad Prolapse, Advice Needed

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by angelbabyamy, Feb 19, 2013.

  1. angelbabyamy

    angelbabyamy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I posted this yesterday in another forum with no responses. I need some advice, so I am bringing it here.

    2/17/18
    Hi everyone,
    Today I noticed a 7 month Splash Marans with a prolapse. I cleaned her in some warm water and noticed that there was an egg in her prolapse. It wasn't very big, I would say a medium sized egg, and I had to maneuver it and gently stretch to get it out. The poor hen kept straining while I was helping her.

    I have no Preparation H, I will have to get some tomorrow. I researched here a bit and used honey when I pushed it back in and put a lot on the outside of her vent. The only antibiotic I have is Teramycin and I put some in her water. I haven't given her food yet.
    I'm worried about infection and she did have some bloody discharge.

    Any advice would be helpful. I have her in a tote in the house.
    Thanks!

    2/18/13
    Since yesterday afternoon, every time I check on her, she has prolapsed again. I haven't gave her food yet, but I know I will need to tomorrow. I have been using Preparation H, Honey and Triple Antibiotic Ointment, After I apply the ointment I have been using Preparation H wipes with Witch Hazel and holding it on the vent for several minutes. I think I have pushed the prolapse back at about 7 times. I don't feel any eggs and she continues to poop, even with no food.Maybe she was really backed up.
    The last couple of times, she was straining to push it back out when I put it back in. Am I going to need to cull her? She seems in good spirits, (except when I am fixing her bum), scratches and wants to eat, and we are developing a nice bond. Marans are such friendly, mellow birds. I really have never spent a lot of time with this hen. She was raised by a broody.
    Any advice would be helpful.I've never had this happen before.Should I feed her a normal diet? I put some rooster booster and Teramycin in her water.
    We do not have a vet that would probably know what to do.

    Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2013
  2. ladytoysdream

    ladytoysdream Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You can keep trying to work with her, but I think you will be needing to have her put down. At some point, her insides will get dirty and infected by being on the outside of her.

    Years ago, when we had 4 pigs with babies, one of them had a prolapse. I called the vet and explained it to him so he would come to look at the animal. He said it was kind of rare and only seen it in big herds. Not in a small herd. He did put it back but she prolapsed again the next day. She had to be put down. It was a pricey visit and then to lose the animal too.
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2013
  3. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Bring her inside, keep her warm and keep the prolapse clean.

    From: http://www.avianweb.com/Prolapse.htm

    Prolapsed Cloaca​


    by Terry Martin, BVSc - Australia​






    There are a number of potential causes for this condition and a number of possible solutions depending on the cause.
    Egg binding can be a cause, and remember egg binding is not simply the physical presence of an egg, it is the deficiency of calcium in the blood and tissues. Therefore it may occur any time before, during or immediately after egg laying. Even when adequate Calcium is available, it may still occur because the amount of calcium required for egg shell production is greater than the amount of Calcium a bird can eat in a 24hr period. This is why the breeding hen must be in perfect condition for breeding, this ensures she has adequate calcium stored in her bones prior to breeding, readily available at an instance notice.
    Because egg binding is really hypocalcaemia (low blood calcium) all muscles of the body become weak and contract poorly. The uterus cannot contract enough to deliver the egg, the cloacal sphincter muscles may be too weak to hold close and the general body muscles may not be burning energy to keep the bird warm - hence they go into shock. Therefore any bird with a cloacal prolapse should be kept warm and given calcium in some form to hopefully increase cloacal muscle tone. I favour crop dosing with liquid calcium as well as in water calcium sources in these cases. Of course cuttlefish never goes astray.

    Cloacal prolapse is also contributed to by uterine or cloacal infection that makes the area irritated and causes straining, resulting in expulsion of the cloaca. Therefore, it is standard to give these birds antibiotics in case of infection. If a prolapse is exposed to the air for any length of time, infection is almost certain to develop, and with time the tissue dries out which causes further irritation and more straining -end result bigger prolapse.
    Potty training is another contributing factor. Training birds to "hold it in" and poop on command puts pressure on the internal organs as the droppings build up inside. It is a dangerous practice.

    Lubricating and gently replacing the prolapsed tissue is important, but be careful what you use. Water soluble lubricants designed for people are good. Sometimes mild antiseptics are indicated, but be careful not to cause further tissue damage.

    In many cases, the prolapse will not resolve and treatment becomes Veterinary in nature with surgery the only option. A purse string suture may be placed around the vent under general anesthesia to keep things inside. But this also often fails. If the bird is a pet, the best option is desexing to remove the swollen uterus and if necessary a procedure called cloacapexy to stitch the cloaca back inside the body. These procedures are quite successful but obviously prevent the bird from further breeding. I have never performed these procedures on birds smaller than a Cockatiel, obviously the stress and length of surgery have to be considered when dealing with a finch.

    If the tissue looks healthy, that is important, if it looks dried and dying, things are probably too late. Mineral oil is not a good idea, either in this situation or in egg binding. It is part of the common misconception that egg binding, or straining equals constipation. There is no physical obstruction in either case, so mineral oil will only cause diarrhea at best. At worse it can cause a GI tract upset that can make the bird even more unwell. I have always been amazed at the number of people who think oral oil will lubricate the reproductive tract. (not a personal criticism of you, but an observation of aviculturists writing bird books).
    If an egg is in the lower reproductive tract or cloaca for any length of time, the uterus and cloaca can dry out and require lubrication, but it must be applied in a retrograde fashion up the cloaca. When I was referring to human water soluble lubricants, I was not meaning for hemorrhoids, but for reproduction - that is K-Y jelly or similar, not oil based lubricants ;)
    Hemorrhoids is a different problem totally to what the bird is suffering. In the human case there are badly swollen blood vessels that need to be constricted - hence the phenylephrine in it. In the case of the bird, there may be some small vascular swelling that could benefit from constriction, however the risk is the bird may absorb large quantities of the phenylephrine and this could have a systemic effect (whole bird).

    So no, I would not normally recommend this type of ointment.
    The calcium solution I use is called Calcium Sandoz. I would give a Zebra 0.1ml orally with a crop needle if it was eggbound or prolapsed. I might repeat this if I felt it was necessary, sometimes 3-4 times daily. I often also use it in water at the rate of 10ml/liter. It needs to be made fresh at least daily. It has the added benefit of being high in sugars, making it palatable and being useful for a bird in shock/stress, however it will grow bacteria in the water supply so this must be considered.

    I would normally always use antibiotics in these cases, as I explained infection is sometimes the causative factor. However pet shop type antibiotics should never be used in any situation as they have little effect on pathogens (disease causing bacteria). This is the reason why they are available without prescription - they are useless. The choice of antibiotic and dose rate is obviously the decision of the Veterinarian treating the case.
    For the aviculturists faced with a prolapsed cloaca, you must stop short of the antibiotics, relying only on the calcium, cloacal replacement and supportive treatment. If this does not work, then it is a Veterinary matter, or else humane euthanasia.
     
  4. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    From: http://www.avianweb.com/eggbinding.html

    Egg Binding​






    Egg binding refers to a common and potentially serious condition where a female bird is unable to pass an egg that may be stuck near the cloaca, or further inside the reproductive tract. Even though egg binding can occur in any female bird, it is most common in smaller birds such as lovebirds, cockatiels, budgies and finches.
    The potential of an egg breaking inside the tract is high, which then can result in an infection or damage to internal tissue; and - if left untreated - death.
    The bound egg may be gently massaged out; failing this it may become necessary for a vet to break the egg inside and remove it in parts. If broken, the oviduct should be cleaned of shell fragments and egg residue to avoid damage or infection.


    Suspected causes for egg binding include:
    • Low Calcium Levels or Hypocalcaemia Syndrome associated with low calcium levels in the blood. Supplementing the breeding hen with a diet rich in calcium and Vitamin D is an important factor in preventing this problem
      • You could provide a dish filled with crushed egg shell (from boiled eggs to kill any bacteria) and/or attach a calcium / mineral block to the cage.
      • In areas where access to natural sunlight is limited (such as in the northern hemisphere during the winter months), full-spectrum lamps can be used to provide UVA and UVB rays.
      • Please click here for natural food sources rich in Vitamin D
      • Potentially discuss supplementation with your vet. Supplementation needs to be carefully screen ed and supervised by a vet since an excess of vitamin D (in the form of a supplement) causes kidney damage and retards growth.
      • Relevant Article: Natural Calcium for Birds - Sources and Absorbability
    • Malnutrition caused by seed-only or low-protein diets. Please click here for information on bird nutrition.
    • Sedentary lifestyle: Often the case when birds are kept in enclosures / cages that are too small for them. The lack of exercise causes poorly developed muscles and obesity.
    • At particular risk are sick and old birds.
    • Pet birds can also develop this problem, as birds don't need a mate to lay eggs. (Obviously, solitary egg-laying females won't produce fertile eggs.)
    Also refer to Chronic Egg Laying and Thin-shelled, soft-shelled, no-shell, porous, misshaped / deformed eggs


    Clinical Signs:
    Loss of appetite, depression, abdominal straining, and sitting fluffed on the bottom of the cage. Some hens may pass large wet droppings while others may not pass any droppings due to the egg's interfering with normal defecation.

    If you suspect that your bird is egg-bound, she should be seen by a vet immediately. The veterinarian may be able to feel the egg in the bird's abdomen. An x-ray may be necessary to confirm the diagnosis. Sometimes medical treatment will enable the hen to pass her egg. Occasionally surgery is necessary.
    Complications from being egg bound can be swelling, bleeding or prolapse of the oviduct.


    Treatment:
    If in doubt as to if the hen is egg bound or not, a few vet sites recommend separation, warmth, warm bath and calcium to all hens in lay that seem distressed.
    This is a life-threatening condition and should be addressed by a qualified avian vet. Your vet may discuss:
    • Calcium shots - immediate solution to help the egg shell harden allowing the hen to hopefully pass it
    • Lupron shots to stop hens from going into breeding condition
    • Spaying your hen as a permanent solution


    The following are samples of actions that have resolved this problem for some birds (please note: not all hens can be saved, especially if it's critical by the time the problem was discovered and no vet is available or can be reached in time). Egg-bound hens go into profound cardiovascular collapse and may not be able to put in the effort to push the egg out without intervention.
    • Place the bird into a steamy room, such as bathroom with shower on until the bathroom mirrors and windows steam up. Desired temperature: 85-90 degrees Fahrenheit / Humidity: 60%. Place bird on wet towel. The warmth relaxes the hen so that the vent can dilate more allowing the egg to pass.
    • A warm water bath can also be of great help (shallow water, of course, you don't want to drown the hen). This relaxes her muscles and often the hen will pass the egg into the water. Make the water as warm as you would like to take a long soak in.
    • Massage the muscles in that area with olive oil. In many cases, this lead to a successful passing of the egg. Note: there is a risk associated with messaging this area. It could cause the egg inside to break - which is life-threatening. Be very careful! If in doubt, it's always best to have the vet take care of it ...
    • Even if the cause is not hypocalcaemia in this hen’s case it will not hurt her to have more calcium.
    • Applying a personal lubricant, such as KY jelly to her vent may also be helpful.
    • To reduce swelling on her vent, some breeders reported success in applying Preparation H to her vent.
    • Successful Passing of the Egg: Following passing of the egg keep the hen in a warm and quiet area separate from the others, until she is out of shock and back to eating and drinking well.
    • Prevention: Provide bird with high-calorie, high-calcium food to help strengthen future eggs and prevent egg binding. Click here for information on bird nutrition.




    Avianweb Visitor Allen McRae, whose Cordon Blue Finch was egg-bound, followed some of the instructions above and wrote back:
    "It worked! We're not sure which suggestion worked. My wife gave her some calcium as well as bath water, and when I went home for lunch she had passed the egg and looked 100% better. My wife gives them water to bathe in daily, so I'm not sure what exactly helped her pass the egg. It was lying in the water, the shell was cracked in half, with one side still containing the yolk."
    Great News!​
     
  5. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Introduction

    A cloacal prolapse is a serious problem requiring immediate veterinary care. Trauma to the internal organs that are prolapsed through the opening can seriously affect the bird. It is seen in cockatoos and the smaller breed birds like budgies and cockatiels. It requires immediate replacement of the prolapsed organs.
    Cause

    Straining due to parasites, abdominal masses or tumors, chronic egg laying, abnormal eggs and poor nutrition are all predisposing factors. Determining the exact cause can be difficult.
    Symptoms

    Birds that have this problem might exhibit depression, straining, lack of droppings, fluffed appearance, and poor appetite. Sometimes the only symptom you notice at home is blood in the droppings. These symptoms occur in other diseases, so the diagnostic approach has to be thorough.
    Diagnosis

    In many prolapsed birds there is a history of recent egg laying. During the physical exam internal organs (intestines or reproductive usually) are apparent at the cloaca. When diagnostic tests are used their main indication is to find the underlying cause to the problem in order to prevent recurrence. These tests include fecal exams for parasites, x-rays for abdominal masses pushing on the abdominal contents, and blood panels to determine general health and organ function.
    Treatment

    Birds with prolapsed cloaca's require emergency care. Many are hypothermic and require immediate warming. Others can be dehydrated so warm fluids are also administered. Antibiotics are usually administered to prevent infection in the affected organs.
    Once a bird is stabilized the prolapse is replaced back into the abdomen. The sooner the better because internal organs that are exposed to the environment are easily traumatized and infected. Amputation could be needed on infected tissue or tissue that has inadequate blood supply.
    In some cases we anesthetize the bird to allow muscle relaxation and subsequent easier replacement of the affected organs. This patient is in a special anesthetic chamber allowing us to safely administer the anesthetic.
    [​IMG]
    This prolapse has been present for several hours. The coloration tells us it is healthy enough to allow replacement back into the abdomen. It will be gently cleansed and flushed with sterile saline. It is an internal organ and requires delicate handling.
    [​IMG]
    The area is lubricated copiously with K-Y jelly and the prolapse is gently manipulated back into the abdomen using Q-tips. This process takes several minutes because the organ is swollen and predisposed to tearing.
    [​IMG]
    After it is replaced special sutures (at the arrows ) are used to prevent it from coming out again. They are put in tight enough to keep the organs inside but loose enough to allow droppings to pass. These sutures will be kept in for at least several days to allow the prolapsed tissue to heal.
    [​IMG]
    Prevention

    There are factors involved with this problem that we have no control over. Factors we can control are good nutrition, a clean environment, spaying birds that are predisposed to egg binding or are excessive egg layers, minimizing obesity and stimulating exercise.
    Careful daily observation of your pets daily habits will help you recognize the early symptoms of this disease. No matter what the problem, any time your pet bird shows any symptoms of a disease, no matter how subtle, it is considered significant and requires immediate veterinary care. This is because birds are masters at hiding illness, and we are all too often presented with sick birds in advanced stages of disease. Our ability to return these birds to normal health is diminished because proper care has not been given early on in the disease process where it is most beneficial.

    Source: http://www.lbah.com/avian/prolapsed_cloaca.htm#trt
     
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  6. nova022

    nova022 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    great information castport pony, thanks for sharing.
     
  7. angelbabyamy

    angelbabyamy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you. I just don't know if I need to cull her or not. I'm at work during the day, so will it dry out and get too dirty during that time? How long does it usually take if it will heal? What should I be feeding her?

    She's only 7 months old, free ranges, is a new layer, not overweight. I am guessing maybe she has a calcium deficiency. I was giving them Flock Raiser this winter when they weren't laying, although they have access to oyster shell.

    Thanks for the information.
     
  8. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    It would be best to put her in a dog crate on towels, that will help keep it clean. Often when they first start to lay this will happen, so if you can fix her, she might never do it again.
     
  9. angelbabyamy

    angelbabyamy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I came home from work and she laid a small egg. I have her in a tote in a darkened area. What foods are best to feed her?
     
  10. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Limit her food to help stop egg laying.
     

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