Balancing m/f ratio to keep flock

EMMomma

Chirping
May 31, 2020
55
64
91
Charlotte, NC
Hello!
In April I got a group of Royal Palm poults to raise up. As is the way of things I wound up with 6 toms and 1 jenny. I would like to keep as many of the turkeys as I can, but I’m also not looking to get any more. I found raising them indoors to be a miserable experience.
I have read that bachelor flocks of turkeys don’t work, but short of getting more turkeys or getting rid of most of my turkeys, that’s the only option I can think of.
Ideally (for me, as I am attached and don’t want to get rid of any of them), would be to either move the jenny to live with my chickens, and keep the boys on their own, or rehome just the jenny.
Thoughts?
Here’s my boys crowding the gate for attention:
E2EE3F60-9459-4F27-8ECF-9F90DD18713E.jpeg
 

R2elk

*
Premium Feather Member
8 Years
Feb 24, 2013
36,560
181,727
1,661
Natrona County, Wyoming
My Coop
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Hello!
In April I got a group of Royal Palm poults to raise up. As is the way of things I wound up with 6 toms and 1 jenny. I would like to keep as many of the turkeys as I can, but I’m also not looking to get any more. I found raising them indoors to be a miserable experience.
I have read that bachelor flocks of turkeys don’t work, but short of getting more turkeys or getting rid of most of my turkeys, that’s the only option I can think of.
Ideally (for me, as I am attached and don’t want to get rid of any of them), would be to either move the jenny to live with my chickens, and keep the boys on their own, or rehome just the jenny.
Thoughts?
Here’s my boys crowding the gate for attention:
View attachment 2790071
A bachelor flock of turkeys can work as long as they are by themselves. If they are kept with other poultry, the other poultry can suffer from breeding attempts.

If you want to keep the most possible of them, sell the hen. She should be easy to sell since hens are usually in demand.
 

SarahGfa

Crowing
Jan 26, 2018
930
1,169
251
A bachelor flock of turkeys can work as long as they are by themselves. If they are kept with other poultry, the other poultry can suffer from breeding attempts.
Will the toms try to breed each other? that happens sometimes in rooster bachelor flocks.
 

EMMomma

Chirping
May 31, 2020
55
64
91
Charlotte, NC
A bachelor flock of turkeys can work as long as they are by themselves. If they are kept with other poultry, the other poultry can suffer from breeding attempts.

If you want to keep the most possible of them, sell the hen. She should be easy to sell since hens are usually in demand.
The chickens have their own coop and run. Keeping them separate from the turkeys should be no problem.
 

R2elk

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Premium Feather Member
8 Years
Feb 24, 2013
36,560
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Natrona County, Wyoming
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Will the toms try to breed each other? that happens sometimes in rooster bachelor flocks.
tt is a possibility but not likely. Give them a soccer ball and they will take advantage of that.

If one of the toms is ill and spends a lot of time laying down, they would try tp take advantage of him just like they will try to breed anything that is laying motionless.
 

EMMomma

Chirping
May 31, 2020
55
64
91
Charlotte, NC
They already neck-wrestle quite a bit and sometimes wind up with scabby bits on their heads and wattles. It doesn’t seem to be too serious though. Will it get more intense than that?
I want to keep them In a coop and run at night, at least, but eventually I’d like to let them free-range on about 2 acres (they still would not have access to the chickens). Their run is ~1500 square feet. Will more space reduce the aggression, or will they still seek each other out?
 

R2elk

*
Premium Feather Member
8 Years
Feb 24, 2013
36,560
181,727
1,661
Natrona County, Wyoming
My Coop
My Coop
They already neck-wrestle quite a bit and sometimes wind up with scabby bits on their heads and wattles. It doesn’t seem to be too serious though. Will it get more intense than that?
I want to keep them In a coop and run at night, at least, but eventually I’d like to let them free-range on about 2 acres (they still would not have access to the chickens). Their run is ~1500 square feet. Will more space reduce the aggression, or will they still seek each other out?
More room will not hurt but they will form their own little cliques. They are currently in their dominance setting phase which will quiet down this fall and erupt into seemingly full scale war next spring. There will be blood and scabs and scars. Any attempts at interfering with the process will only prolong it. Hens can act the same way in the spring.
 

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