Benefits of keeping incubator outside?

muscovy94

Songster
11 Years
Nov 11, 2008
912
12
189
Vicksburg, MS
I live in vicksburg, ms. To say its humid here would be a vast understatement. Since it is so humid here, wouldn't it make sense to hatch eggs in an incubator outside (like in the garage/barn). My thinking is that it would more naturally mimic the humidity levels that the eggs need and so I wouldnt have to add any water to the incubator. I was researching dry incubation and this idea just came to my mind. any input on this would be greatly appreciated!
 

Sonya9

Crowing
7 Years
Feb 7, 2014
1,922
1,161
291
Georgia
I live in vicksburg, ms. To say its humid here would be a vast understatement. Since it is so humid here, wouldn't it make sense to hatch eggs in an incubator outside (like in the garage/barn). My thinking is that it would more naturally mimic the humidity levels that the eggs need and so I wouldnt have to add any water to the incubator. I was researching dry incubation and this idea just came to my mind. any input on this would be greatly appreciated!

The humidity is high inside the house too unless you are running dehumidifers (a/c doesn't lower it a whole lot).

I would keep it inside where I could keep an eye on things. The chicks will be acclimated to the humidity either way. One thing you want to avoid is huge temperature swings (or excessive heat) and having it outside may be risky.

I know some folks that do run their incubators outside in the chicken coop area, so it can be done, but personally if it was my first time I would not do it.
 
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AmyLynn2374

Humidity Queen
5 Years
Oct 11, 2014
15,028
2,680
456
Gouverneur, NY
I live in vicksburg, ms. To say its humid here would be a vast understatement. Since it is so humid here, wouldn't it make sense to hatch eggs in an incubator outside (like in the garage/barn). My thinking is that it would more naturally mimic the humidity levels that the eggs need and so I wouldnt have to add any water to the incubator. I was researching dry incubation and this idea just came to my mind. any input on this would be greatly appreciated!
You can do the "dry" incubation or the low humidity incubation methods as I like to call them inside the house as well. I run a low humidity incubation inside and run dry when I can. I am getting ready to do a hatch here in a couple days and will be running dry as long as the air cells are growing at the right rate. (And my humidity stays above 25%).
 

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