Biosecurity question

SomeChickinTN

Songster
Nov 19, 2018
307
496
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E TN
I understand that it's a good idea to quarantine new chickens even if you trust the source, but what if you are just starting a flock? Do you still need to quarantine chickens if there have never been any in your yard before?

If I don't, I'll need to keep them separate from my brooder chicks when the chicks are ready to go outside?
 

DobieLover

Easily distracted by chickens
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Jul 23, 2018
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I understand that it's a good idea to quarantine new chickens even if you trust the source, but what if you are just starting a flock? Do you still need to quarantine chickens if there have never been any in your yard before?

If I don't, I'll need to keep them separate from my brooder chicks when the chicks are ready to go outside?
I assume you are getting some pullets/hens and already have some chicks in a brooder? And you have a coop all set up and ready to go?
 

SomeChickinTN

Songster
Nov 19, 2018
307
496
156
E TN
I assume you are getting some pullets/hens and already have some chicks in a brooder? And you have a coop all set up and ready to go?

Yes, the first coop is almost finished. The second one will be delivered tonight. I don't think they'll be far enough apart for quarantine, but I'm getting the chickens by next weekend, and if I have to I can wait until the middle of Jan to put the chicks out
 

DobieLover

Easily distracted by chickens
Premium Feather Member
Jul 23, 2018
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NY Southern Tier
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Yes, the first coop is almost finished. The second one will be delivered tonight. I don't think they'll be far enough apart for quarantine, but I'm getting the chickens by next weekend, and if I have to I can wait until the middle of Jan to put the chicks out
Just curious: why two coops?

If you are already brooding chicks and you are bringing in new chickens, the brooding process in and of itself will allow a quarantine as they will be kept in a more climate controlled area. It will take time for the chicks to feather out to the point where they can go outside and they have to grow further than that before you should try to integrate the flocks. Generally speaking, when the chicks stop making baby noises, they would be old enough to start integration.
Did you purchase the chicks or hatch them? If you purchased them, did you have them vaccinated for Marek's?
 

SomeChickinTN

Songster
Nov 19, 2018
307
496
156
E TN
Just curious: why two coops?

If you are already brooding chicks and you are bringing in new chickens, the brooding process in and of itself will allow a quarantine as they will be kept in a more climate controlled area. It will take time for the chicks to feather out to the point where they can go outside and they have to grow further than that before you should try to integrate the flocks. Generally speaking, when the chicks stop making baby noises, they would be old enough to start integration.
Did you purchase the chicks or hatch them? If you purchased them, did you have them vaccinated for Marek's?

Thanks. Yeah, I bought them online and had them vaccinated. The two coops are because the one we built can only hold a dozen if each chicken gets 4sq. And I don't think the other one is much bigger. And I want to allow for a little bit of growth.
 

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