bloody poop

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by chickenlover47, Jan 22, 2015.

  1. chickenlover47

    chickenlover47 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have four chickens and only one is laying eggs so far. This is the second time I have found bloody poop but this is the most blood I've seen in their poop. Can anyone help me what to do or what to look for. None of the chicken look like they are in pain or hurting for any reason . They run around and flap their wings like normal. Should I be concerned?

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  2. Lady of McCamley

    Lady of McCamley Overrun With Chickens

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    Without seeing it in close up, real, I cannot say if that is normal or not...it's a bit redder than I would like, but could still be within normal.

    It is normal to see some pink/red intestinal lining shed...and that looks close to normal...just a bit redder which is why I hesitate. Intestinal shed is usually stringy, not frank red and watery. Sometimes it takes a lab report to be certain.

    Take a look at this "poop" photo chart below to help you discern if what you are seeing is normal intestinal shed or the blood of Coccidiosis.

    You can always treat if in real concern that it looks too red. I recommend Sulmet in the water.

    Lady of McCamley

    http://chat.allotment-garden.org/?topic=17568.0 (good photos of intestinal lining shed which is normal)

    http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2012/02/whats-scoop-on-chicken-poop-digestive.html (good coccidiosis photos)
     
  3. chickenlover47

    chickenlover47 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I do have cedar as there bedding and I did stop giving them Apple cider vinegar since my husband brought up a science project where he put chicken bones in vinegar and they became flimsy. Well I may have messed on that now reading how to fix it and how to prevent it. I know they do eat there bedding but I did not know how toxic it was for them.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2015
  4. BayBay Peepers

    BayBay Peepers Overrun With Chickens

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    Pine shavings are a safer bet than cedar.
     
  5. Lady of McCamley

    Lady of McCamley Overrun With Chickens

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    x2 about pine shavings instead of cedar...cedar has oils that produce harmful vapors for small animals like chickens.

    The science experiment and giving ACV in the water is completely different situations. Acetic acid can leech calcium, but that was a high concentration applied directly to bone and left for a number of days.

    You are applying only about 1 Tb to a gallon of water which they are drinking...it's less acidic than a coke and going into the gut where it is meant to be acidic.

    Use apple cidar vinegar that is raw, unfiltered and unpasturized with the "mother" which is the friendly flora that is healthy for the gut.

    Keeping a healthy gut flora and acidic balance is important in keeping unfriendly bacteria like coccdia in check. Also feed them a some plain yogurt too. Those 2 things can go a long way in helping to keep your birds gut healthy and immune system strong...which in turn helps prevent coccdia overgrowth...coccidiosis.

    Lof Mc
     
  6. Chris09

    Chris09 Circle (M) Ranch

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    To be honest cedar and pine shavings have oils that can be harmful to animals.
    For poultry I use either dirt or builders sand (never play sand) on the ground.

    As for the blood, if it was me I would treat for coccidiosis, clean the pen out good then lay a good layer of sand down.
    About a week after treating for coccidiosis I would also treat for worms.
     
    1 person likes this.
  7. chickenlover47

    chickenlover47 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I take it time eggs are not good to eat?
     
  8. chickenlover47

    chickenlover47 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So the sooner the better for the treatment I take it. Usually from first sign of this how long do you have to treat the ailment. I noticed the blood poop about a week ago but just a little bit but this one was large portion. I do give them yogurt at least twice a month if not more. I just gave them some right now will that help? I am not sure when I could buy some of this medication since I don't get paid till the 31st. Is there something I can do as a home remedy for now until I get some?
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2015
  9. Lady of McCamley

    Lady of McCamley Overrun With Chickens

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    Yes, if you are dealing with Coccidiosis, the sooner the better as it can become deadly in a short amount of time...especially for young chicks...it essentially is the coccidia, which is actually a protozoa, eating away at the intestines of the chicken causing severe blood loss. Basically chicken dysentery.

    That is assuming it IS coccidiosis and not normal lining shed...increased lining shedding can be aggravated by a change in feed or change in weather...and a certain amount is perfectly normal.

    If Coccidiosis, I recommend Sulmet in the water, and you can get a bottle of that for around $12 in the feedstores. If not Sulmet, then Corid. You would have to pull eggs for about 2 weeks after last treatment, if my memory serves. EDITED TO ADD: in answer to your question of how long, follow the directions on the label, but typically Sulmet is used for about 1 week. I've not used Corid, but follow the label.

    If you simply can't get meds until next week (which I wouldn't recommend if it is coccidiosis on the rise), then you can do some things to try to help and which would be good maintenance/prevention at any rate.

    First, clean your coops really well and get rid of all poopy bedding. I would get rid of the cedar shavings as it is definitely toxic to birds. Some have concern with pine shavings, but many farmers use it on their livestock and chickens, and I have used it for years with my flock and have had no problems. Otherwise, you could go to straw or sand as the other poster recommended.

    Also make sure your water and feeders are clean. Wash and disinfect them with a chlorox wash, or at least good hot soapy water, rinsed well. Keep ACV in the water as that helps reduce the growth of bacteria and protozoa. Never use ACV in metal water cans as it will erode the protective coating releasing zinc toxins.

    If you have medicated chick starter feed laying around, begin feeding that to all your hens as their sole feed for the next 2 weeks, or until you get Sulmet. While the amprolium in the medicated feed is not a strong anti-coccidial treatment if you have a crisis, it can help if your birds are still eating well, and it can ward off mild infections. I would also put them immediately on ACV in their water, and make it a bit more acidic...like 2 TB in the gallon. It is very important that the ACV has the mother in it, raw, unpasturized. Also add garlic to their chicken feed, in a warm mash, with yogurt daily. What you are trying to do is discourage the protozoa overgrowth and encourage good flora to keep it in check.

    All soil has a certain amount of coccidia, it is only when the soil has overgrowth or a chick has no resistance or a chicken has an internal overgrowth that it becomes a problem...this can happen if a new strain has been introduced from a visit to someone else's farm or someone visiting your coop with soil from their farm on their shoes or weather patterns have caused a sudden increase.

    That's about all I can say other than read the information linked by other posters and review the poop charts.

    Lady of McCamley
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2015

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