BO foot shaking

Kaesi2020

Chirping
Premium Feather Member
Hi all, we have our first cold and snowy day here in upstate NY. Temps are in the 30s and half an inch of snow fell. My 8 month old BO's feet are shaking at times. Could this be from the cold? Is this worrisome? She seems OK otherwise, just nervous about the snow. She seems like a cold hearty breed, she is nice and puffy and healthy otherwise. Is this shaking typical? She has access to dry coop, dry run space under coop, and a run that had some snow but I covered with new pine shavings.
 

Kaesi2020

Chirping
Premium Feather Member
I will take more shortly, these are the run space. They also have a 10x10 extended dirt run but it is covered in a thin layer of snow so they are staying away from it (first snow so I think they are reluctant)
 

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Kaesi2020

Chirping
Premium Feather Member
Hm... not a hen expert... or every lived with hens in snow. Is she drinking and eating okay? Is she lethargic? Does her breath smell foul? Are her feet sore for you to touch? (these are mostly just general checkups) Are her feet almost raw? Does she feel warm to touch?
Yes very good appetite and hydrated. Seems fine other than that foot that looks like it's vibrating at times. I would not say they are raw...but they look a bit redder and irritated in between the toes.
 

Chickenman MAN

Chirping
Oct 25, 2020
314
204
80
United Kingdom South Devon
Yes very good appetite and hydrated. Seems fine other than that foot that looks like it's vibrating at times. I would not say they are raw...but they look a bit redder and irritated in between the toes.
Hmmmm. I really don't know! Found this though. Perhaps put a heater in the run (electric and dialed down reasonably low)

4 Things That Cause Red Chicken Feet
9/7/2016
0 Comments

Picture


There are around four (4) main reasons why your chickens' feet look red or more pinker than usual.
  1. Scald
  2. Winter Heat Transference
  3. Breed
  4. Hormone Surge
Scald
Scald is when the skin on the legs, and particularly the feet of your chickens, turns a very red raw colour and becomes painful for the chicken. This is a condition brought about purely through housing problems – wet bedding and flooring results in the ammonia in the droppings literally burning through the skin. If you have ever burnt your hand on the oven, scale this up to your whole foot and imagine walking on it – scald is excruciatingly painful and requires treatment! However, scald is also easily prevented by cleaning out the housing regularly, moving runs around, and providing plenty of space. Good ventilation is also essential because ammonia also gives off vapours that are toxic to the lungs, so can cause breathing difficulties.
Information from: www.darwinvets.com/poultry/common-chicken-problems-diseases

Signs include limping and holding feet up off of the ground. Can be very sensitive to the touch.


Winter Heat Transference
If winter is approaching the blood flow in a chickens feet will increase by 40% of its usual. Due to this increase in blood flow, the chickens inbuilt heat transfer of blood heat (that prevents large quantities of body heat to be lost through their feet), this increase of blood flow will often cause your chickens feet to go red/pink.
Information from: http://forum.thepoultrysite.com/discussion/14554/redirect/p1


Breed
Noticeable in some breeds and not others. The Naked breeds are the most common in this category.


Hormone Surge
Particularly noticeable in roosters as they come into sexual maturity.


Some Treatment Ideas
  • Vitamin A may assist.
  • Stand chicken in lukewarm water with iodine solution in it.
    (Do not put wet chicken outside immediately after this treatment. Allow them to fully dry and recuperate indoors. Moisture will increase the chill)
  • For Scald: Figure out where the chicken is getting into an ammonia or other problem area and mitigate the area or barricade it ASAP. Put down gravel, straw or wood shavings to help alleviate the wet muddy ground situation.
  • Change the roosting rails to wood. Metal and wire conducts more cold to their feet.
 

Kaesi2020

Chirping
Premium Feather Member
Hmmmm. I really don't know! Found this though. Perhaps put a heater in the run (electric and dialed down reasonably low)

4 Things That Cause Red Chicken Feet
9/7/2016
0 Comments

Picture


There are around four (4) main reasons why your chickens' feet look red or more pinker than usual.
  1. Scald
  2. Winter Heat Transference
  3. Breed
  4. Hormone Surge
Scald
Scald is when the skin on the legs, and particularly the feet of your chickens, turns a very red raw colour and becomes painful for the chicken. This is a condition brought about purely through housing problems – wet bedding and flooring results in the ammonia in the droppings literally burning through the skin. If you have ever burnt your hand on the oven, scale this up to your whole foot and imagine walking on it – scald is excruciatingly painful and requires treatment! However, scald is also easily prevented by cleaning out the housing regularly, moving runs around, and providing plenty of space. Good ventilation is also essential because ammonia also gives off vapours that are toxic to the lungs, so can cause breathing difficulties.
Information from: www.darwinvets.com/poultry/common-chicken-problems-diseases

Signs include limping and holding feet up off of the ground. Can be very sensitive to the touch.


Winter Heat Transference
If winter is approaching the blood flow in a chickens feet will increase by 40% of its usual. Due to this increase in blood flow, the chickens inbuilt heat transfer of blood heat (that prevents large quantities of body heat to be lost through their feet), this increase of blood flow will often cause your chickens feet to go red/pink.
Information from: http://forum.thepoultrysite.com/discussion/14554/redirect/p1


Breed
Noticeable in some breeds and not others. The Naked breeds are the most common in this category.


Hormone Surge
Particularly noticeable in roosters as they come into sexual maturity.


Some Treatment Ideas
  • Vitamin A may assist.
  • Stand chicken in lukewarm water with iodine solution in it.
    (Do not put wet chicken outside immediately after this treatment. Allow them to fully dry and recuperate indoors. Moisture will increase the chill)
  • For Scald: Figure out where the chicken is getting into an ammonia or other problem area and mitigate the area or barricade it ASAP. Put down gravel, straw or wood shavings to help alleviate the wet muddy ground situation.
  • Change the roosting rails to wood. Metal and wire conducts more cold to their feet.
Thank you!
 

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