breed question from a newbie

tara7815

Songster
10 Years
Aug 29, 2009
103
0
109
I feel like this is a stupid question but I'm asking anyways
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I have 5 rhode island red hens
5 white porcelain d'uccle bantams (sex - yet to be determined)
6 packing peanuts
1 ee

(I think I got that right..LOL)

I am keeping all of the hens.
whatever bantams that are hens will stay with us
I will keep only one bantam roo the others will go
and I am torn at this point...
I have no intention of keeping the packing peanuts (even though they're adorable..LOL)
But if I kept just one or if my EE was a roo and I kept it.

I would have about 5-7 hens and 2 roos. Is that a bad equation?
and obviously we run the risk of fertilized eggs (which doesn't bother me) but if down the road I get a broodie hen that hatches one - I will likely have mix breed chicken coming from that. Is that a really bad thing in the chicken world as it would be in the dog world (the world I'm more familiar with...LOL)

My intention is to house these birds all together in a 10x10 coop with a 10x12 run

I guess I'm trying to determine what to keep and what not to keep in order to have a responsible flock and I am not sure of the ins and outs and dos and don'ts yet in the chicken world.

(If this matters - my son and daughter will be showing their bantams at our 4-h fair)
 

PortageGirl

Songster
11 Years
Nov 8, 2008
2,511
18
181
Portage County, Ohio
There is absolutely nothing wrong with mixed breed chickens!!!

Their eggs are JUST as delicious, and their meat i JUST as nutritious!!! I have often had mixed up flocks, and they are fun. You shouldn’t sell them as anything other than mutts as I am positive you know, but if you want backyard hens, who cares?

Assuming your two roos get along decently, (some do! Or at least ignore each other well) that’s still a bit high percentage wise, but with one being a bantam, he won’t be able to bother the big hens –too- much. The mixed bantam/standard groups I’ve seen, the bantam roo tends to get his hens off away from the standard sized roo quite often. Because the hens are small, the standard roo often allows this. Maybe he doesn’t realize they’re mature?
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You may at some point need to figure out a way to separate out some space for two groups, and your run is a little small, but if they free range, or you can add another run for one roo if need be, I’d go for it! If they become too much trouble, you can send one or both to freezer camp, or re-home if that option doesn’t appeal.

I just saw that your littles (son and daughter) will be using them for 4H. Having a roo can muss the hens feathers etc, but again, with some places for seperating a few and their keeping a watchful eye on things, it can be managed.
 
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CHIC

Songster
10 Years
Aug 18, 2009
605
0
129
Roanoke
Also, as long as you collect all your eggs every day, you won't be getting babies. Therefore, don't worry about that aspect. As long as u have the space, go for it.
 

Ridgerunner

Crossing the Road
12 Years
Feb 2, 2009
27,846
21,979
907
Southeast Louisiana
I would have about 5-7 hens and 2 roos. Is that a bad equation?

Instead of a lot of typing, I'll give a link to another thread where I express my opinion.

https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=219443


and obviously we run the risk of fertilized eggs (which doesn't bother me) but if down the road I get a broodie hen that hatches one - I will likely have mix breed chicken coming from that.

I agree with the others. Gather the eggs and you will not have new chicks. Break a broody if you don't want to hatch eggs. You mention you are familiar with dogs. Then you know you have to be the pack leader to have happy safe dogs. You cannot let a dog dominate you. Same with chickens. You have to manage and control them in many things. They cannot control you or it gets out of hand.

My intention is to house these birds all together in a 10x10 coop with a 10x12 run

With 7 to 9 chickens, this would work well. It is well above the normal minimum recommendations of 4 square feet per chicken in the coop and 10 square feet per chicken in the run. But since two of them may be roosters, you might have some problems. Read the link above.

I guess I'm trying to determine what to keep and what not to keep in order to have a responsible flock and I am not sure of the ins and outs and dos and don'ts yet in the chicken world.

I applaud you for trying to learn and be a responsible, knowledgable flock owner. I wish more people would.

Good luck!
 

PortageGirl

Songster
11 Years
Nov 8, 2008
2,511
18
181
Portage County, Ohio
Oh, I want to add, if your littles want to raise some purebred D'uccles, a second sectioned off area to isolate those birds for at least 3 weeks is a must... after 3 or so weeks, the only sire will be the d'uccle.

Chickens can lay fertile eggs for 2 to 3 weeks after the last time a rooster covers them... that's why the you need to make sure only the rooster you want to father the chicks has access for that amount of time.
 

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