Broken Toenail

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by MilesFluffybutt, May 23, 2017.

  1. MilesFluffybutt

    MilesFluffybutt Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 16, 2016
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    Good morning,

    I have a 4-week old Silkie chick that keeps damaging its toenail. Between the scratching, roosting and jumping around, I know that it's going to happen, but is there any sort of supplement I can give it to strengthen the nails? I've been washing it out, but haven't applied anything to it. Should I be? If so, what?

    Thank you so much!
     
  2. debid

    debid Overrun With Chickens

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    I had this problem with a chick in the first batch I raised in a brooder with a plastic floor. I think scratching at the plastic didn't trim the nails the way the wooden floor I'd used prior did.

    I blunted the nail tips with a pair of clippers after tending the broken one with styptic powder. And now I give them soil access much sooner. That seems to do it.
     
  3. MilesFluffybutt

    MilesFluffybutt Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 16, 2016
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    Hi Debid,

    You're absolutely right about the plastic bottom. My brooder has a plastic bottom, which I had padded with wood shavings, newspapers and paper towels. About 10 days ago, I removed the wood shavings because they kept eating it, and that's about the time Yeti's toenail started bleeding.

    *facepalm* Not sure why I failed to make the connection.

    Thank you for connecting the dots,
    J.
     
  4. Phoenixsw

    Phoenixsw Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I never had it happen with young ones, but 2 of my adult hens have broken their claws. Did the same as debid. Styptic powder and I use a pair of small animal slippers to keep them trimmed.
     
  5. MilesFluffybutt

    MilesFluffybutt Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 16, 2016
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    Hi Phoenixsw,
    I never thought about it, but should I trim their claws/toenails as adults? I live in northern Vermont where it snows from October to May where they're less likely to go outside in the snow and cold.

    As you can probably tell, I'm a newbie chicken keeper, having started late in the fall after being pranked with a rooster. Jokes on them... I love the little bugger. As a social critter I figured he needed some non-human company.

    My only concern now, aside from broken toenails, is how to properly introduce the flock. Can I start now with slow introductions through a fence? Or should I wait until they're older?

    Any thoughts/advice you have would be greatly appreciated.

    Thank you.
    j.
     
  6. Phoenixsw

    Phoenixsw Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The only claws I trim regularly are the fifth ties on my Salmon Faverolles. And we might do our rooster since he's tearing up or girls. You don't really need to do any regular trimming unless they get real long and are dangerous. They should keep them worn down by scratching.
    As far as introducing new members to the flock, there are so many recommendations from members, just do a search and you will find lots of ideas and you can choose which one will work for you.
    When I got my first batch of 6 babies Salmon Faverolles, Speckled Sussex, Buff Orpington), it turned out 3 of them were cockerels. So I got 2 more (Welsummer, Easter Egger) to replace them. There was an age difference of 3 weeks. But the size difference was enough, we raised them separately until the second 2 were big enough to get away, even putting poultry fencing down the middle of the inside of the coop and run. When the younger ones were 8wks, we started letting them all out together in the yard. After about a week of that, we finally took the fencing down. They still scuffled a bit, but nothing serious. And that was 2 yrs ago and all is still well.
     

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