bubbles on chickens eye

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by DVK, Jun 15, 2019.

  1. DVK

    DVK In the Brooder

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    oof my chickens keep getting sick. anywho i noticed one of my chicken had weird watery bubbles on her eye i did some research and found out that its most likely Mycoplasma Gallisepticum (respiratory disease). anyone know how i can cure her? I heard someone used tylan 50, would i need to use needles or could i buy tylan 50 powder instead? anyone know of any other kind of way to cure her?
     
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  2. AmyJane725

    AmyJane725 Crowing

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    Tylan 50 (injection liquid) is the way to go if it is indeed MG. You don't have to inject her with it though.

    Administer ¼ mL/lb of body weight orally 3 times a day for 5 days and that should cure her.
     
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  3. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Enabler

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    I'm sorry you have a chicken that keeps getting sick. If you have photos of her that would be good.

    Watery bubbles in the eye can be an indication of Mycoplasma. If you are dealing with Mycoplasma, there is no cure. Antibiotics will help with recovery, but your chicken will still be a carrier of the disease.
    You can give Injectable Tylan50 orally. Remember to weigh her so you give the proper dosage.
     
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  4. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

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    Tylan is tylosin, and you may order the powder for the water here:
    https://www.jedds.com/shop/tylan-soluble-100-g/
    Dosage is 1 tsp per gallon (add the water to the powder, not the other way around or it will not mix properly) for 3-5 days. Change it every 3 days.
     
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  5. AmyJane725

    AmyJane725 Crowing

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    That particular chicken will never get the symptoms again though, right? And she won't die from it. That's what I meant by "cure". Sorry, bad choice of words.
     
  6. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

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    Mycoplasma (MG) is never cured. The antibiotics can help symptoms and getting over the current infection. But since it is a chronic disease, symptoms may return during a period of stress (molting, extreme cold weather, etc.) Some chickens may never have another outbreak, but some may. They can also develop resistance to antibiotics, so that others may be needed with new outbreaks. All chickens in the flock may be carriers, even if they do not show symptoms.
     
  7. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Enabler

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    No. That particular chicken, if she does have MG (Mycoplasma Gallisepticum) could very well become symptomatic again and again, you just don't know. She may never show any symptoms again either. Can't say whether she would die from it or not either.
    While the mortality rate from MG is fairly low in adult chickens, MG can often be accompanied by other respiratory viruses or E.Coli.

    Stress can make birds become symptomatic (molting, integration/flock disruptions, weather changes, another illness, etc.) again.

    Even if they never show symptoms again, they are carriers, this means they can spread it through dander/dust, feathers, droppings, etc. Any birds that have been living with them or exposed would also be considered carriers, even if they never show any symptoms.

    Antibiotics will help with recovery and treatment of symptoms, but they are not a cure.

    MG is also one of the few respiratory diseases that is transmitted horizontally and vertically. Horizontal transmission is bird to bird, dust/dander, your clothes/shoes!, from rodents, wild birds, etc. Vertical transmission is through the egg to the embryo in hatching eggs (very possible for chicks to hatch out as carriers of MG).

    MG can also cause stunting/unthriftiness, also impacts egg productivity, can damage the reproductive system (it's been linked to Salpingitis in laying hens).
     
  8. DVK

    DVK In the Brooder

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    so some of my chicken might not get infected? i previously had a orange chicken that died for unknown reason and she has been sneezing alot and now this chicken been acting badly and had been sneezing alot as well as having bubbles on her eyes, she will most likely die within this week since she keeps laying down on our field while the others explore. would it be a waste of money to buy tylan if it doesnt cure them?
     
  9. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

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    They will all be positive for MG eventually, but not all chickens will show signs. Some may fight off the disease naturally, but if a lab tested their blood, it would be positive. Tylan will only treat symptoms. They can get secondary infections. I would only treat birds that have symptoms, not the whole flock. MG is very common in backyard flocks. Most people deal with it by closing the flock to new birds, treat birds when they show symptoms, and remember that MG can be transmitted through hatching eggs. MG lasts in the environment only 3-4 days after all chickens or fowl are gone. At that point, any new healthy birds added would free of the disease.

    Some people with MG in their flocks may use Denagard (tiamulin) in the water for 3 days a month to control outbreaks, and to also treat sick birds.
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2019
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