Buckingham Palace 5'x6' Coop with 18' run build

Wendizzle

Chirping
Mar 28, 2021
14
63
59
Wanted to share my summer project with everyone here. We are a military family, and on our 7th place to live finally got someplace that allowed chickens and we own our own property! Moved here in May, husband left for training in July for a few months. I decided to "save money" buying a big coop by building one on my own. With zero building experience and a significant lack of strength and endurance.

Here we go!

20210713_093208.jpg

Starting with the frame. I was feeling pretty good about myself at this point. <cue ominous music>

20210720_162208.jpg


Pressure treated floorboard and some of the frame. I was planning on using the concrete footers but gave up. Just used pressure treated 2x4s for the run's frame and painted it with latex paint for protection. I also framed a little porch on the back end so that I can get into the coop during our cold winders here.

20210725_123617.jpg


More framing, putting up the roof. I realized at this point that I messed up the roof center because I altered the coop plans I bought so that there would be a little overhang over the nest box on this side, so one side of the rafters are longer than the other. You can't tell by looking, it's only by an inch or two, but my OCD was (and is) very annoyed by this.

I also realized that the run framing was not very stable with the 2x4s sitting on the base like this. Toe nailing them was not enough. So I used some metal roofing joist things to help with stability and made some beams going horizontally to create more support.

20210725_123643.jpg

I forgot to mention that I do not own a nail gun. Really wish I did, especially at this point in the build. I did have a pneumatic hand nailer because there was no way I was going to be able to hand nail all of this. Loved that little guy, but a nail gun would have been so much easier and faster.

20210725_123705.jpg

The run is 18' long. At this point of framing the roof I realized I may have bit off more than I can chew.

But too late now, and I am too stubborn to stop!

20210728_170013.jpg


Placed 18" deep board around the bottom of the coop to allow for me to do deep bedding. I had to alter the coop plans to raise the little run door as well as the nesting boxes so that they would be above the bedding.

20210805_185413.jpg

Placing this siding on the coops was possibly the most physically difficult for me. I had my weak self and my 12 year old daughter for muscle. You know that scene from Friends with Ross yelling "PIVOT" with the couch? Imaging that but trying to lift giant pieces of siding with two very weak people. I am sure our neighbors got a laugh out of that.

20210805_185427.jpg

I am doing metal roofing, but placed wood over the coop portion with roofing paper on top for moisture absorption in the winter.

Also cut out the doors and windows with a jigsaw. I made my 12 year old crawl in through that window to get the guide holes for the big door at the front. We was not pleased by this, but I found it pretty funny.

20210808_181251.jpg

Metal roofing going on. It was about 98 deg up here in Northern NY at this point and I kept having to take breaks every hour because of the heat. I also realized that I am an idiot for making this coop so big.

20210808_181342.jpg

As much as I was regretting making the coop this big, I was hopeful that with all the physical labor and sweating that I'd lost some weight by the end of this project.

Spoiler alert. I did not.

20210814_150423.jpg
20210814_182949.jpg


Windows going in! This was probably the most satisfying part of the project. Everything else was heavy and sucked.

I decided to make the nesting box have a side drop down like Carolina Coops recommends, so the top of the nesting box does not lift up at all. Looking back I probably should have made it lift to make it easier to clean out, but I was so tired at this point I just wanted to finish this thing and there was so much more left to do. Therefore, solid nest box top.

20210814_182958.jpg

Putting some linoleum in for easier clean up in the future. I put some around the sides as well.

20210822_123905.jpg
20210822_191823.jpg

20210822_193433.jpg


Wood stain looking pretty with the white latex paint! It was starting to feel real at this point. The light at the end of the tunnel.

20211111_103715.jpg


Inside of the coop the other day (has been in use for a few months now). The nest box is still blocked but I will be opening it up soon. I have young English Orpingtons so they start laying late, probably not until Jan-May next year at the earliest.

The board at the door is removable for when I want to clean out the deep bedding.

20211111_103813.jpg

The back porch area after we stained it. It is pretty muddy back there so it is not looking pretty in this pic but oh well.

20211111_103828.jpg

The coop has vinyl hardware cloth but we wrapped it in plastic in preparation for the winter and snow this winter. This plastic ended up getting ripped off by a wind storm after this pic, and of course after I had cleaned the run out and placed fresh straw down. It is now reinforced with 1x3 beams.

The solar lights I got off Amazon and they work great. I have them set to motion sensor to help me when I check on the coop at night and to alert me from the house if something is prowling around the coop at night.

20211111_103915.jpg


The run, I was planning on putting some siding at the triangle at the top but I was so over this project by the end that I just didn't have it in me. So it is open right now until I feel like tackling that project. Maybe next Spring.

20211111_103929.jpg

Don't ask me how much I spent on this thing. I build it myself to save money and I am sure I did with the size of it by the end. But I don't want to think about how much it cost by the end.

20211111_103843.jpg

Currently working on installing solar to the coop for heated water. It's slow going because I am trying to not burn down this coop with my inexperience. I plan on putting the controller in a junction box next to this door, then debating on what to do with the battery/inverter. I am debating putting the battery on a shelf on the outside in a case and the inverter in the little outdoor storage under the nesting box (with a ventilation hole(s). I worry if I put it inside the coop the chickens with mess with the wires or a spark will ignite their bedding...

Finally, here is a picture of our flock yesterday for fun. All Harry Potter names. If anyone is interested in some English Orpington roosters in northern NY let me know! The kids want to give them to someone instead of the plans I have for them. 👿

20211120_160002.jpg

20211009_170823.jpg

Fred and George, lavenders, about 18 weeks old.
20211120_155945.jpg
20211120_155458.jpg

20211011_151139.jpg
20210914_191551.jpg

Our oldest rooster (around 19 weeks) and one of the favorites, BuckBeak, with our 9 year old (who managed to disappear for the entirety of the building project, the genius). He is a lavender laced english orp hatched from Papas Poultry.

Thanks for reading!
 

Attachments

  • 20210728_165927.jpg
    20210728_165927.jpg
    679.3 KB · Views: 2
  • 20210728_165946.jpg
    20210728_165946.jpg
    575.8 KB · Views: 2
  • 20210728_170028.jpg
    20210728_170028.jpg
    441 KB · Views: 2
  • 20210814_150416.jpg
    20210814_150416.jpg
    500.6 KB · Views: 2
  • 20211120_163851.jpg
    20211120_163851.jpg
    615 KB · Views: 2
  • 20211120_163909.jpg
    20211120_163909.jpg
    645.6 KB · Views: 2

3KillerBs

Enabler
Premium Feather Member
12 Years
Jul 10, 2009
11,862
30,948
1,116
North Carolina Sandhills
My Coop
My Coop
Welcome to BYC. That's a beautiful job you've done.

Looking back I probably should have made it lift to make it easier to clean out,

Over time you won't regret that. I swapped the lift-lids for side drop-downs because the joint on the lift lid ALWAYS leaks eventually. Also, the stick you prop it with gets knocked out and then the heavy lid hits you on the head or slams on your hand.

I was planning on putting some siding at the triangle at the top but I was so over this project by the end that I just didn't have it in me. So it is open right now until I feel like tackling that project.

No, don't.

Cover it in hardware cloth because you need ventilation at the top of the coop all year round.
 

DobieLover

Easily distracted by chickens
Premium Feather Member
Jul 23, 2018
35,410
290,409
1,662
NY Southern Tier
My Coop
My Coop
Great job! You should write up a coop build article.
I recommend you remove the top half of the upper gable corners on both sides of the coop and cover those areas with hardware cloth. If the space between the rafters is not open, I would open it up and secure with 1/2" hardware cloth too. You need more ventilation in the coop.
You should also remove the trim around the windows and attach 1/2" hardware cloth over them then put the trim back on. Plenty of predators in NY can rip through the window screens.
If you haven't already done so, install a 2' predator apron around the whole works. Then you can just leave the pop door open year round to improve ventilation even further and permit you to sleep in a bit!
Love the rustic color combination. ❤️
 

Wendizzle

Chirping
Mar 28, 2021
14
63
59
I recommend you remove the top half of the upper gable corners on both sides of the coop and cover those areas with hardware cloth. If the space between the rafters is not open, I would open it up and secure with 1/2" hardware cloth too. You need more ventilation in the coop.
I have two 8" gable vents on both sides of the coop (four total), do you think I need more ventilation? I have some pics with them but don't have any good pics of the door side with the 2 vents:

20211111_103929.jpg

20211111_103715.jpg
 

3KillerBs

Enabler
Premium Feather Member
12 Years
Jul 10, 2009
11,862
30,948
1,116
North Carolina Sandhills
My Coop
My Coop
I have two 8" gable vents on both sides of the coop (four total), do you think I need more ventilation? I have some pics with them but don't have any good pics of the door side with the 2 vents:

An 8" circle gives only 50 square inches. A square foot is 144 square inches and you need to think in terms of square feet, not square inches when housing birds. :)

The usual guideline is that you need at least 1 square foot of permanent, 24/7/365 ventilation per bird -- best located above the birds' heads when they're sitting on the roost.
 

Wendizzle

Chirping
Mar 28, 2021
14
63
59
You should also remove the trim around the windows and attach 1/2" hardware cloth over them then put the trim back on. Plenty of predators in NY can rip through the window screens.
If you haven't already done so, install a 2' predator apron around the whole works. Then you can just leave the pop door open year round to improve ventilation even further and permit you to sleep in a bit!
I forgot to mention I do have a predator apron, or as I like to call it, the "neighbor's children tripper" as I think all of the local children have tripped and faceplanted on parts of it until I got it to lay down properly. 😆

I will have to fix the window screens-thank you for the suggestion! using the trim will be a lot easier than doing it from the inside of the coop.
 

Northwest PA chicken dad

In the Brooder
Oct 22, 2021
19
62
48
I want to say very nice job and also thank you for your family's military service to the best nation in the world. I also build our coop and run from scratch 10x10 and 10 x 30 run our 30 mini raptors love it. Very similar to your design if I could make a couple of suggestions I would place a drop board under your perches and I always found my birds are more comfortable with tge 2x4 perch with the wider end facing up especially the ophingtons we have 10 of those . But you get tge satisfaction of I did this and proud of it awesome job 👏 😀
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom