Buff x White Silkies?

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by vfem, Dec 5, 2008.

  1. vfem

    vfem Yoga...The Chicken Pose

    7,325
    15
    264
    Aug 4, 2008
    Fuquay Varina, NC
    Just curious what the % of outcome from breeding these would be? Buff Roo White Hen

    I know that the white is dominate as I've read, but never see anything about this cross. I really wanted a white roo, but have a buff... and my white roo search keeps falling through (my own fault...totally all my screw ups). So is it safe to say I breed my white and buff I can still get some white?

    (VERY new at this, and planning to start breeding some this spring.)
     
  2. vfem

    vfem Yoga...The Chicken Pose

    7,325
    15
    264
    Aug 4, 2008
    Fuquay Varina, NC
    Come on I know you silkie freaks are out there... I am not the only one who worships the ground they peck on! [​IMG]
     
  3. chickNjake

    chickNjake Chillin' With My Peeps

    435
    0
    129
    Sep 3, 2008
    east tn
    hmm... I'm not sure, I believe white masks other colors so... would buff give 2 buff genes, and white give either 2 white genes or 1 white and one "other" maybe, I still don't understand the white gene [​IMG]
     
  4. ksacres

    ksacres At Your Service

    4,230
    10
    231
    Nov 16, 2007
    San Antonio TX
    It depends on wether you have recessive white or dominant white.

    If you have a homozygous dominant white, all your chicks will be white.

    If you have heterozygous dominant white, half your chicks will be white.

    If you have recessive white your bird that is white will automatically be homozygous (otherwise you wouldn't see the white...), and all your chicks will carry the white, but none *will* be white-unless your buff carries recessive white too. You would have to breed one of those chicks back to mama (or sibling to sibling) to see the white.

    Recessive white is preferred to dominant white because with dominant heterozygous white you can have color leakage into the plumage. Two recessive white birds also insures that 100% of the offspring come out white, with two heterozygous dominant white birds, you can have any and all kinds of colored sports pop up.

    Confused yet?

    In short, either white to start can lead to more whites down the road. Maybe I should have stuck with that answer to begin with...
     
  5. vfem

    vfem Yoga...The Chicken Pose

    7,325
    15
    264
    Aug 4, 2008
    Fuquay Varina, NC
    lol [​IMG]

    I so skipped science in high school... can you tell?!

    Maybe I'll just have to hatch a few and see for myself. Then I guess once I see what I get I'll know if its a recessive or dominate white and whether there is a recessive white in my buff. If I'm catching that right... which I'm probably not!
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2008
  6. ksacres

    ksacres At Your Service

    4,230
    10
    231
    Nov 16, 2007
    San Antonio TX
    Sounds like you got it [​IMG]

    I loved science in high school-can ya tell?? [​IMG]
     
  7. Smoky73

    Smoky73 Lyon Master

    1,617
    10
    181
    Feb 8, 2007
    Colorado
    I have a similar problem here but yet different.

    I have a buff roo and buff hens, very nice buff hens to be exact. However, the rooster is a sparce breeder and often the offspring ends up with ALOT of black and too red of wattles and combs, even though the rooster has a dark comb.

    MY desire, is to mate a white cock, with dark comb and excellent type, to my buff hens. All my white cockerels are live breeders but AI well, so I can get fertility in my hens no problem.

    Thing is, I want BUFF babies and wondered what my outcomes would be to get the buff.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by