Building New Coop/Barn...Phase 5 Great Barn Build, OCCUPIED! 3/6/16

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by speckledhen, Sep 29, 2015.

  1. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    I had considered the stall mats awhile back for Isaac, whose arthritis was so painful that I felt it would keep his floor warmer and cushion his jumps.

    The breezeway was not going to be storage, generally. We have the old coops for that purpose. As I mentioned, we are very much still in the planning/decision making process and all input is greatly appreciated! I had saved this photo awhile back from a barn company and thought maybe someone could build it for us, basically a pole barn. We have built every building here, but it's wearing on us and because of my husband's back and my arthritis, we decided we really need someone else to do this one.
    Is this something like you're talking about?
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  2. Percheron chick

    Percheron chick Overrun With Chickens

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    No. When I'm on a computer, I'll find a picture.
     
  3. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Spring Dreaming Premium Member

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    Around here, pole sheds are usually put in with a gravel surface, there's no foundation, the poles go down below the frost line. A concrete slab is optional.
     
  4. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    We're in north Georgia at 2000 ft elevation, so our frost line isn't that deep. I'm thinking you could build a pole barn and then build anything you want underneath it, but still not sure. The metal buildings give you more floor area than the wood ones.

    I went over the price list from a local shed builder and a 12x 28' wood shed with one 9 light door (will trade that for the regular double barn doors they have), 4 windows, a 3/4" plywood floor instead of 5/8 delivered on skids would run around, with tax, about $6500. I'd still have to do the inside, cut pop doors, insulate, etc., as I would with any of these delivered-and-set-up buildings. I could get a rectanglar 28 x 24 metal carport type, enclosed with double doors, 4 windows, delivered for around $8200 plus tax (if I get it from NC, I pay no sales tax and I'm on the line) double the floor space, but of course, you have the potential rust issue with moisture from bedding, poop and respiration and other differences between the metal and the wood shed types and it's not as warm as wood inside, IMO, harder to insulate unless you're stacking hay bales from floor to ceiling.

    I'm wondering if I could get a local guy to build it and save $$ over a shed company, but you risk getting someone who isn't reliable or does a crappy job, etc.



    ETA: I am thinking with a steel building, that spray rubberized coating for truck beds or tool handles might cover the metal studs where litter and poop and other moisture might get to them down low.

    But, if I wanted to, how does one make pop doors in a metal building and frame them out? Has anyone done that? I'll have to look in the coop pages to see if there are any metal buildings in there.
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2015
  5. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Found someone's photo on the web, I'm not sure whose it is, so sorry not to give credit (whoever you are, you did a great job) but this is what I'm envisioning, a metal carport building as the basis for a barn type coop, insulated walls and ceiling. I see that someone did cut pop doors so we might be able to do that and frame the edges out with wood or other soft material to cover the sharp raw metal. Thinking now we could do a 22' x 26' (actual footprint is 22x25, other foot is front and back roof overhang) ETA: Found him-it's one of our members, Redwood Forest Bantams. Hasn't been around in awhile. These pics were posted in 2009.



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    My question is that WILL this coop be okay in winter and summer with insulated walls and ceiling and a sealed motor barn exhaust fan in a wall for summer? There will be shade from big oaks to protect it in summer. I've avoided metal, always thought it way too hot, but we could also just have a carport delivered and build up wood walls with treated lumber like some have done and stain rather than paint it. The site is not conducive to having a pre-fab building delivered because of the trees.
    Found this photo online as well-great job on this one, could do something similar tweaked for chickens from this site: http://diycozyhome.com/turn-a-carport-into-a-barn/
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    What's good about a metal carport is that they deliver in sections, better for our location, plus you get a much larger building than with a wood shed, at least from these companies. Now, I would love for some guy to build me a coop but I have no idea who to hire. Been disappointed in folks I hired for different jobs in the past, even with references checking out.

    @Bear Foot Farm you did one, didn't you? Your photos are gone from BYC, if you see this, would you post pics of what you did with yours? Thanks!



    ETA: we just ran string lines and checked the drop from front to back and not sure a metal carport would even work. It would really need a foundation that would jack up the back end off the ground too much. The drop on the most level side is about 14" from front corner to back corner. Sigh. May be back to trying to buy a wood building and it won't be as large as I wanted, probably only 12'x 24'. We'll have to get a few huge stumps out of the way from where they'd have to bring it in but it's doable, I think.
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2015
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  6. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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  7. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Spring Dreaming Premium Member

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    Metal sheds can turn into a big tin can during summer, heating up pretty quickly, I've never had a small shed, so do plan on some good ventilation during summer and providing shade that's not in the shed.
     
  8. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Our issue is the slope we have. Shade is great there so it might be okay as long as there was plenty of ventilation and a big exhaust fan, but the slope will necessitate expensive foundation prep adding to the total. I think we're back to buying a premade wood barn on skids, unfortunately, IF they can get it up to the spot coming through our back lot. Of course, that too will need insulating and pens inside, but on a much smaller scale than the barn we really wanted to do.

    Wish I could afford a real barn and just have someone build it on site. I may get the entire plan for a premade one and get estimates for someone to do it for me here and maybe, just maybe, I could get a few extras out of that. Oh, well, was all excited about a big open barn interior and I guess it isn't in the cards with our very limited budget. We just need all the birds in one building to make chores easier in winter.

    I'll take a picture of the location and you'll see the challenge. One wild plum tree has to be cut down and one cherry sapling transplanted and that's about it.
     
  9. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Spring Dreaming Premium Member

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    Are you where you have an Amish community, they build nice barns, though I don't know how they compare in price.
     
  10. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    The Amish are just like any other people, some are great and some are terrible....with building and with animal rearing.
    That maybe used to mean something good, now it's just overused and misused marketing term.
     
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