Building New Coop/Barn...Phase 5 Great Barn Build, OCCUPIED! 3/6/16

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by speckledhen, Sep 29, 2015.

  1. 1muttsfan

    1muttsfan Crowing

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    Regular garage doors that roll up are usually flat panels stacked up. You can insulate each panel separately. My garage doors insulated with about 2" thick foam panels covered with thin plastic sheeting

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  2. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    This isn't a regular garage door, though, just a little roll up type. My dad had a garage door business so I'm familiar with how those are made, but this one rolls up pretty much like a piece of paper, more like a heavy, metal window blind.

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  3. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    I would imagine that you can get insulated roll up doors.
     
  4. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Not with this company. This is what comes with their building, only different size doors. You might be able to tape a thin reflective type bubblewrap insulation on the back of the door and see if it rolls up.That's what we'll be insulating the roof with, like this. May be something even thinner that would work:
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    Last edited: Oct 10, 2015
  5. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    I'm leaning toward the color they call "clay" for the body siding. Here is the chart again-which of the lighter roof colors will go with that, maybe the sandstone? My DH says why not the same color for body and roof but I think I want them a shade off from each other, doesn't matter which is lighter, body or roof.


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    Last edited: Oct 10, 2015
  6. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Chicken tender Premium Member

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    That will look nice, are you putting in windows, otherwise you can put in some light panels in the sides or roof so it's not too dark. Ignore me if it's dumb advice, I'm following all your progress.
     
  7. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Absolutely, we will have four windows they install, two on each long side. The entry door isn't the best, just a little diamond shaped window, but at least, it will let in a bit of light. Eventually, we plan to another window or two ourselves. These are single paned windows, not the nice ones that our current coops have, but it's pretty standard in metal buildings like this.

    You make all the suggestions you want-I'd never consider any advice that you give me as dumb!
     

  8. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Clay and Sandstone would go good together.

    I have white/light colored metal sheds and light colored asphalt shingles on coop shed...they all get hot inside, even the one that's mostly shaded.
    Added some 1/4" foam sheet insulation to the undersides of the coop shed rafters on the south side this year.....
    .....helped a little I think slowed the heating anyway, but with all the ventilation I have it still was as hot inside as outside and sometimes hotter.
    Was glad we only had a few heat short waves this summer, and it mostly cooled off some at night. I don't do well in the heat.
     
  9. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    I like that combination, too.

    Thankfully, at our mountain elevation, nights cool down quite a bit from the day in summer. I don't do well in the heat, either! I used to live in Dayton, Ohio and I remember those summers as much worse than we have here in the GA mountains. Winters, of course, were terrible there, worst weather of anywhere I ever lived, probably more like yours.

    I'm thinking of a flat panel heater for at least the old hens section during winters. They're sealed and give off just a little radiant heat, safer than a heat lamp. May use hay more extensively in this new barn during winter than I did in the coops, which I know is warmer, though not as absorbent as shavings. Memories I have are of being in granddaddy's hayloft, being all warm and snuggly.
     
  10. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    The carport place has an online estimator (not perfect, can't add the inner end type wall to make the storage area, but hey, otherwise good). These are the drawings it comes up with for this building we're getting.
    Front, facing our house
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    Back (plan to put a motion activated solar security light back there), entering the storage area, which is 5'x 24'

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    and the sides are identical. We may scavenge one of the small windows from the building we're tearing down, a small slider, to put on the side near the back, opening into one side of the storage area.

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    Area ready for Jason to do the work either tomorrow or Tuesday. Weather forecast sunny and pleasant, yea!

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    Removed fencing and grape vines so he could do the work without anything getting in the way.
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    Transplanted one of the best ones to the perimeter fence, at least the small section we could get up there until Mark gets back here and moves his dozer. I can't get in touch with him so DH may take matters into his own hands.

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    Last edited: Oct 11, 2015

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