Can a Rooster Overdo It?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by ClareScifi, Apr 1, 2012.

  1. ClareScifi

    ClareScifi Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I keep my rooster in the house on weekend mornings, so his crowing won't disturb the neighbors who might be trying to sleep in late on the weekends.

    This morning my rooster crowed incessantly, wanting to be let out with the girls.

    It got me to wondering whether a rooster can wear out his crowing apparatus, get a sore throat, or even get a throat cancer or something from excessive crowing? Does anyone know of any research I could read on this topic?

    Once I let him outside, he hasn't crowed once since.
     
  2. scratch'n'peck

    scratch'n'peck Overrun With Chickens

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    I suppose he could strain his vocal chords like a human could and have a sore throat. But if a person shouts a lot, it won't lead to throat cancer, so I doubt that a lot of crowing will either. I suppose you could try bringing in one of his hens with him to see if it cuts down on his crowing. You are a considerate neighbor.
     
  3. ClareScifi

    ClareScifi Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for the helpful reply.

    Well, the people who share the house with me probably don't think I'm a considerate neighbor (haha!), but they are the ones who brought me the egg that hatched into this adorable rooster, so I thought they could probably stand his crowing this morning, as they have to get up early for church, anyway, but he sure was noisy if you were inside the house!

    I walked down the field to see how far his crowing could be heard from outside the house. You could hear him at the back of the house of a man who has hens and wants a rooster-- I don't think he's mind the crowing.

    But at the next house 6 geese flew into the field and started having a territorial fight over the old cornstalks. They honked so noisily they droned out the crowing of my rooster.

    Having him in the house does really muffle the crowing. It doesn't carry nearly as far. Unless you are inside the house. LOL.

    A hen with him might not be a bad idea. Thanks for thinking of it. Maybe the smallest pullet. I do worry he might hurt her, though, with all the pots and wood and stuff in there. Jumping about, mating. But it might work. Especially if I put her in first.

    Next week I'll be out of town on Sunday morning and will have to leave him in the coop if the weather is warm, or it might get too warm in the solarium for him until I get home on Sunday afternoon. I sure hope he doesn't upset the neighbors with his outside crowing that morning.
     

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