Can I mix Feed for Different Birds?

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by SportTees, Sep 16, 2008.

  1. SportTees

    SportTees Chillin' With My Peeps

    I have Quail, Ducks, and chickens. I currently feed

    Chickens- 20-24% chicken feed
    Quail- Gamebird Feed or 24% chick feed on occasion
    Duck- Corn and Gamebird Feed

    My question is can I mix the gamebird feed, Chicken feed, and Corn together and feed it to all the birds. I seems like the feeds are very similar to me. I just don't know if quail can eat cracked corn? It would be much easier to feed them all the same rations or is there a food that would be good for all. Tell me what you think.
     
  2. priszilla

    priszilla Chillin' With My Peeps

    674
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    Jan 12, 2008
    easley sc
    some folks feed flock raiser-I am getting my feedstore to get me some.In the meantime-I am using redneck rooster mixed with gamebrd flight and breeder to feed all the adult and teenage chickens, the turkeys and the ducks. I wanted to get some special duck food but my feed store hasn't been able to get any ...yet.[​IMG] I add grit and oyster shell and DE in it whenI put it in the trash can I store it in- jstu makes it easy for me to feed it-I also put the grit and oyster shell in containers for them to pick out as needed.I add baked egg shells as I have them.
     
  3. SportTees

    SportTees Chillin' With My Peeps

    I haven't heard of Flock Raiser-- who makes it?
     
  4. SportTees

    SportTees Chillin' With My Peeps

    What do you feed your mix of birds
     
  5. priszilla

    priszilla Chillin' With My Peeps

    674
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    151
    Jan 12, 2008
    easley sc
    Purina- it comes as a pellet and as a crumble.Mine are not thrilled with the crumble I ordered.I guess I will go back to using gamebird layer.
     
  6. BaronRenfrew

    BaronRenfrew Chillin' With My Peeps

    Gidday:

    You can easily make a feed mix that you can feed to everything. It's all about protein: ducks and chickens need a minimum of 16-18%, pheasants and other game birds 22%, day old chicks of pheasants 28%

    the rest is whatever is available: cracked corn, wheat, oats, barley, wheat, triticale, rye, rice, buckwheat, peas, sorghum, alfalfa pellets (rabbit food) etc. Omega 3 eggs from a grocery store is nothin but chicken feed with flax added. In asia birds are fed rice and soybean. if people can eat it birds can eat it, including berries, vegetable scraps, greens (grass, dandelion, etc.) In the wild they eat wild grains and seeds from plants we consider weeds.

    Cat food is also fed by some to birds (it's 45% protein) but must be mixed.

    birds can survive on almost anything: chickens will eat the leaves and seeds found in hay bales, chickens near water will eat snails and trapped minnows, etc.

    it is suggested to feed cracked over whole grains so it is digested better, and they'll need grit as well

    if you feed prepared pellets, mash, or crumble feed than no grit is needed

    bird keepers I know feed a mix or turkey starter and cracked corn 50/50 and feed it to everything from turkeys and pheasants to chickens and ducks. I did this this year for my quail, chickens, and pheasants and fed this to ducks in the past.

    the only thing to note is that medicated feed will kill waterfowl.

    extremely high protein can damage internal organs but nothing to worry about at these levels.

    My butcher told me of one farmer who gets leftover bread from a bakery and that is all he feeds to his meat chickens.

    so feel free to use what's available and cheap as long as protein is high enough. if protein is too low it doesn't hurt but they will stop laying. birds with a more varied diet will lay eggs with a deeper colour yolk: from yellow to deep orange. i haven't heard if it makes a difference on hatchability but i suspect that they are healthier with a more varied diet.

    if calcium is too low the eggs will have a thin shell or possibly even no shell. this is easy to fix, add ground egg shells to the feed, or oyster shell, or your feed store may stock a grit that is high in calcium
     

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