Can mixed breeds look like Pomeranians?

iambebabeba

Songster
8 Years
Jun 8, 2012
68
41
111
This is Pyramid (daughter named her) she is a white embden/brown African x Toulouse/embden/Chinese . What should I cross her with to get more that look just like her? I can’t get Pomeranians here in Hawaii but she is so lovely. Her siblings came out mostly grey with some white patches and wing tips, 2 solid white and One look similar to a lavender. I will post some picture of them later today. What Should I breed her to ? her own siblings or father or a different pure breed ? Also I’m not sure yet she is a female. That’s just a guess. If she is male what should I breed her to. I would love my whole flock to have these beautiful pied patches.
 

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iambebabeba

Songster
8 Years
Jun 8, 2012
68
41
111
Ok here are some pictures of the flock. This is Dad Embden/Toulouse/Chinese
EB46152D-FFA2-4FC0-9ABC-39FC8A4AD112.jpeg

These are the siblings
45F8F126-5292-4E4D-8393-FA15BC27FEBE.jpeg

46A2D8ED-2863-4F96-833C-5079434A9460.jpeg

55E32DAC-A1C8-433F-810B-CCB426304D43.jpeg

This is mom the embden/brown African cross she is the all white one.
7D73F413-1477-4B21-ACAD-52F7515B767B.jpeg
 

NatJ

Free Ranging
Mar 20, 2017
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Geese aren't really my thing, but these ideas should work with any species:

--Hatch more eggs from the same parents (they produced this color once already!)

--Cross the special one to the opposite-sex parent, cross the sisters to the father, brothers to the mother. (Good chance of getting more special ones.)

--Cross the special one to any gander or goose, then cross a son or daughter back to the special one. Also cross sons and daughters with each other.


I googled for goose genetics... the only spotting I find is caused by one gene, called spotting or saddleback. But the pictures look different than your goose. So I don't know if it is that gene or not.

The saddleback or spotting gene in geese is sex-linked and recessive. If that is what your geese have, the breeding ideas I listed above will work just fine. If it's something else, they are still a sensible way to deal with a color caused by unknown genes.
 

iambebabeba

Songster
8 Years
Jun 8, 2012
68
41
111
Geese aren't really my thing, but these ideas should work with any species:

--Hatch more eggs from the same parents (they produced this color once already!)

--Cross the special one to the opposite-sex parent, cross the sisters to the father, brothers to the mother. (Good chance of getting more special ones.)

--Cross the special one to any gander or goose, then cross a son or daughter back to the special one. Also cross sons and daughters with each other.


I googled for goose genetics... the only spotting I find is caused by one gene, called spotting or saddleback. But the pictures look different than your goose. So I don't know if it is that gene or not.

The saddleback or spotting gene in geese is sex-linked and recessive. If that is what your geese have, the breeding ideas I listed above will work just fine. If it's something else, they are still a sensible way to deal with a color caused by unknown genes.
I would breed more but I don’t have her mother anymore. I will try breeding her to one of her siblings and hope for the best 😊 or if I can find another goose that’s not related with similar traits. I wonder what I would get if I crossed her with a pilgrim ?
 

NatJ

Free Ranging
Mar 20, 2017
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I wonder what I would get if I crossed her with a pilgrim ?

I wouldn't, unless you know yours does NOT have the saddleback gene.

Pilgrims have the dilution gene.
Saddleback + dilution = white.
So that might be a path toward re-creating nice white Embdens.

I would breed more but I don’t have her mother anymore. I will try breeding her to one of her siblings and hope for the best 😊

Do you have her father? You could cross her to him.

You can also cross her sisters with her brothers--some of them might produce the right color too.
 

iambebabeba

Songster
8 Years
Jun 8, 2012
68
41
111
I wouldn't, unless you know yours does NOT have the saddleback gene.

Pilgrims have the dilution gene.
Saddleback + dilution = white.
So that might be a path toward re-creating nice white Embdens.



Do you have her father? You could cross her to him.

You can also cross her sisters with her brothers--some of them might produce the right color too.
Yes I do have her father. Thanks for the heads up about the pilgrims cross because I have 1 female pilgrim. I will try crossing the pilgrim and Pyramid to her father. I suspect he has the spotted gene because he is spotted. He is mostly white with light and grey spotting all over .
13D78249-CF8C-41CA-83C7-C7919C94721B.jpeg

That’s him on the left.
 

iambebabeba

Songster
8 Years
Jun 8, 2012
68
41
111
Wait a second. Is the spotting gene the same as the saddleback gene? If it is I will use a different male on my Pilgrim Peety.
 

NatJ

Free Ranging
Mar 20, 2017
6,305
12,101
596
USA
Wait a second. Is the spotting gene the same as the saddleback gene?

The saddleback gene is also called spotting gene, yes.

I can only find information on 4 color genes for geese:
dilution
saddleback (= spotting)
buff
blue

And all four of them are sexlinked!
And three of them are sexlinked, with blue being the exception.

I don't know if that means goose colors are genetically simple, or if it just means that no-one's studied them enough to figure out more.
 
Last edited:

iambebabeba

Songster
8 Years
Jun 8, 2012
68
41
111
The saddleback gene is also called spotting gene, yes.

I can only find information on 4 color genes for geese:
dilution
saddleback (= spotting)
buff
blue

And all four of them are sexlinked!
And three of them are sexlinked, with blue being the exception.

I don't know if that means goose colors are genetically simple, or if it just means that no-one's studied them enough to figure out more.
Awesome. Thanks 👍
 

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