Can Runner ducks swim..and a few other questions.

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by Keleigh, Mar 23, 2009.

  1. Keleigh

    Keleigh New Egg

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    Ferrum
    Hello,
    I'm getting ready to move my ducks from my chicken coop to my pond. I had a friend tell me that runner ducks can't swim. Is this true? I would hate to have to find out the hard way.

    Also, my ducks are being moved to a large pond (about 2 acres big). If anyone has any pics of housing they use for ducks around a large pond, I would love to see them.

    Also, is it true that snapping turtles will kill ducks. I think we may have a resident snapping turtle in the pond. If so, does anyone have any suggestions for how to catch it?

    I just want to make sure I have all of my ducks in a row...before I move them...lol

    Thanks!
     
  2. nettie

    nettie Enslaved by Indoor Ducks

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    Chicago, IL
    That's totally a myth!!! My two runners are swimming in the tub *as we speak*. Who ever started this myth is goofy.... They swim just like any other duck, lol. They are just skinnier.
     
  3. Duck Keeper

    Duck Keeper Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Out in the Boonies
    Yes, it's a myth! Runners LOVE water just as much as other ducks. [​IMG]

    And snappers WILL kill them. If they don't take limbs off, they'll probably drag them underwater and drown them.
     
  4. millebantam

    millebantam Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Little Rhody
    Ah....Snappers.......that's right up my alley. One of the easiest methods to catch a big snapper out of a bigger pond is called "jugging". You take an old bleach bottle and attach a length of stout nylon cord, or thin rope. On the other end, you attach a wire leader or thin steel cable with a decent size treble hook on it. You then take a good hunk of chicken meat, usually a thigh portion, and weave it onto the hook, while hiding all of the exposed hook. You determine the average depth of the pond and set the length of your line to be anywhere from about 3 feet below the surface, to a foot off the bottom, taking into consideration the structure of the bottom of the pond and potential snags.

    You then take your "jugs" to the end of the pond where the wind will be blowing from your back and release them, trying to get them to drift to the opposite end of the pond. The following day, you need a canoe or small boat to go out onto the pond to check your traps. It may take a couple of trys, but you will eventually end up with a really PO'ed big turtle on the end of one or more of the lines. What you do with him then is totally up to you, lol.

    This method has worked for me and it probably will for you too if you stick with it. You will probably be surprised at just how many "resident" turtles you actually have. Hope this helps.
     
  5. TheDuckCrew

    TheDuckCrew Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 21, 2009
    Connecticut
    i have snapping turtles in my pond (well not really my pond, the town's pond) and they have never done anything to my ducks (KNOCK ON WOOD REAL HARD). they normally stick to one side of the pond and my ducks stick to the other. they're no dumbies. but the turtles haven't woken up yet and the ducks are LOVING it!! they've got the whole pond to themselves! we've had geese in the pond (wild geese...not ours) for years and have never had a snapping turtle incident.
     
  6. Duck Keeper

    Duck Keeper Chillin' With My Peeps

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    When you catch one, be aware that they ARE strong enough to take your fingers off. [​IMG]

    Have fun!
     
  7. TheDuckCrew

    TheDuckCrew Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 21, 2009
    Connecticut
    they are strong enough to take off more than your fingers!! and they're necks are unrealistically long. don't underestimate them! my neighbor bugged one with a huge stick when it came out to lay eggs, it was huge, it snapped the stick in half (it was a fat stick, more like a log) and its neck was sooo long, we were all surprised.
     
  8. Keleigh

    Keleigh New Egg

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    Ferrum
    Thanks for your advise. I saw the turtle(s) first hand quite a few times last summer, so I figured that he must have stayed for the winter. He is HUGE...although I have never seen another snapping turtle to compare him to. His shell must be at least 2ft in diameter. We tried to catch him last year with milk jugs (not bleach bottles) but the jugs were no match for him. He completely OBLITERATED them. I guess the plastic in bleach bottles are much stronger, so maybe this year we will have better luck. I have been watching the pond to see any signs...he may still be sleeping.

    I think I'm going to wait to make sure my pond is turtle free before I put the ducks there.

    I figured that the runner ducks could swim...but I didn't want to take any chances.

    THANKS!!
    Kelly
     
  9. Wifezilla

    Wifezilla Positively Ducky

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    I had a friend tell me that runner ducks can't swim. Is this true?

    Your friend is a goober [​IMG]

    Good luck with the turtle. Those things ARE strong...and people lose fingers and toes around them.

    I hear they are good eating though​
     
  10. geareduplyn

    geareduplyn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Your friend is a goober [​IMG]

    Good luck with the turtle. Those things ARE strong...and people lose fingers and toes around them.

    I hear they are good eating though

    I wasted a lot of my youth fishing on the big rivers and have caught a lot of snappers, but in all my travels I've never known anyone who has lost a finger or toe to a snapper. Yes they are very tasty. A real bear to process though, because they have both an external and an internal skeleton.
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2009

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