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Chicken Breed Focus - Faverolles

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by sumi, Aug 6, 2015.

  1. CherriesBrood

    CherriesBrood Chicken Photographer Premium Member

    Have you considered entering these into the calendar contest? I'd love to see one win and get put on the calendar! :D
     
  2. Cockatrice6420

    Cockatrice6420 Chillin' With My Peeps

    I will let you know if I have a successful hatch.
     
  3. keesmom

    keesmom Overrun With Chickens

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    There are five, 5 toed breeds. Faverolles, Dorkings, Sultans, Houdans and silkies. It is not a defect.
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. Kino

    Kino Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My Coop
    These chickens are so beautiful! I had one named Bebe, and she was super nice to have around. [​IMG]
     
  5. Cloverleaf Farm

    Cloverleaf Farm Bearded Birds are Best

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    First, I would like to thank Sumi, for posting a pretty accurate description of the Faverolles. It's nice to see you did some research. Most of the time when I read a description of the breed, it is filled with partial truths and inaccuracies.

    I got my first Faverolles from a friend who had gotten a mix of birds from a feed store. I had never heard of the breed before. But they quickly became my favorites, and I started researching. These hatchery birds were FAR from standard, both in color, and temperament, and as much as I liked them, I was so happily surprised when I hatched my first chicks from a reputable breeder!! I was AMAZED! And even several years later, they are still surprising me, and I would never choose any other breed.

    I do want to answer to a couple of things that were mentioned above. One person mentioned how "flappy" her Faverolles is, at 11 weeks old. That is very common in these guys as youngsters. I almost guarantee you will find that she settles down around laying age. Though, hatchery birds are always a gamble, if they are going to be reliable to the breed standards or not, that's why I say I "almost" guarantee. ;)

    The other one was the person from Australia, who said that her Faverolles aren't very good layers. I can't speak for Australian birds, but I can assure the rest of you that is not the rule for the breed in the US, or UK. They were originally bred to be a good layer, and they are. It is possible that production is not something that has been selected for in Australia, and is a trait that has been decreased, or it could just be the particular line, but it is not the norm for the breed.

    [​IMG]
    Club logo that I had re-done when I was club president. Cock that came out of that first hatch from a reputable breeder that I mentioned above, and hen that I hatched out of my own breeding.


    [​IMG]

    "Fudge" the cock from the logo.

    [​IMG]

    "Flo", a hen that I hatched, being shown by one of my 4-H kids. Won either champion, or reserve champion continental in every youth show she ever entered.

    [​IMG]

    Posting this pic to show a nice wide skull, on a hen who had her beard plucked out when she was a youngster, and it never grew back in. But she was my favorite Fav hen I've ever had. Both for type, and personality.

    [​IMG]

    Champion Continental hen. A little darker overall than I really prefer, but great type.

    [​IMG]

    And, just for fun :D
     
    2 people like this.
  6. Kino

    Kino Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Haha, those are so cute! The drawing is [​IMG]
     
  7. mame1616

    mame1616 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Faverolles are a fabulous breed! I'm continually delighted by their personalities and appearance, and very grateful for all of the great breeders I have met, and their wonderful advice.

    Ok, soap box time, for those who are considering breeding Faverolles:

    This is not an easy bird to breed. I strongly recommend that newbies do their research and ask lots of questions, before beginning a breeding program. One of the problems facing the breed in this country is a very small gene pool that is being regularly contaminated by people not breeding to standard, or breeding birds with faults, and then not culling strongly as the birds grow. (Granted, this issue is not limited to Faverolles only.) There are a small number of breeders out there doing it right, but a great number just breeding because "chicks are just so cute," or they want their kids to see the "miracle of life," or they just "want to see what happens if." Unfortunately, many of the results of these breedings end up producing even more birds that, because of poor genes, weaken the breed as a whole. It can take decades for faults (such as four toes, no beards, visible wattles, bad coloring, etc.) created through poor breeding to be eliminated from a line, and when the number of good birds is already so small, it can be devastating for the breed as a whole. You need to ask yourself - no matter what breed you're working with - why am I doing this? Is what I'm doing going to contribute positively to the breed?

    No bird, no matter the breed, is going to be high quality from a hatchery. Some hatcheries are better than others, but only the occasional fluke will allow that bird to be showable to the standard. If you want birds that look like those in the standard, then you have to buy from responsible breeders. Starting a breeding program with hatchery birds can be done, but good results can take many years, because the good foundation just does not exist in those lines.

    If you want birds that meet the standard, take your time, do your research, and start with the best stock you can get. Be willing to pay for the quality, and be willing to wait. A lot of the best breeders only have a handful of pairs and trios producing, so you may have to wait for next year's hatch. Trust me - it's worth it!

    If you want birds for your backyard, then the hatcheries are a fine place to go. Many of us were introduced to Faverolles this way. The wonderful personalities exist in those birds, if not the looks. They are a great family pet, and great with kids.



    ***For the poster who commented that her chicks are freaking out every time she comes near - I have seen this with every single hatch, and have heard it from others. It's almost like Faverolles need time to grow into their brains or something. I don't even bother trying to get close to them until they are five months or more - they calm down a great deal by then. I have some 3-month-old pullets right now, and they have little birdy heart attacks every time I come to change their water and food. I just get in and out of there as quickly and calmly as I can, and leave them be. I know this seems like contrary advice, but it always seemed to me that I was stressing them more by forcing my attentions on them, instead of just leaving them alone to mature. Just be patient - they'll calm down. It's not you - it's them. I have no idea why this is.

    For the poster that managed to get the birds to be friendly after a couple of weeks - good for you!
     
    4 people like this.
  8. keesmom

    keesmom Overrun With Chickens

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    We call them popcorn chicken during this stage. They stay this way for a while. They always do calm down as they mature.
     
    2 people like this.
  9. mame1616

    mame1616 Chillin' With My Peeps

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  10. Cockatrice6420

    Cockatrice6420 Chillin' With My Peeps


    I would just like to say that I truly respect those of you so dedicated to breed preservation. There are so many beautiful pure birds that are in danger in the world and need the help to maintain. I would also like you to rest assured that my little friends are not breeder purchased but rather poultry supply purchases. I do however share the joy of pure breeding a couple other breeds that were breeder purchased.
     
    1 person likes this.

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