Chicken Paralysis in both legs cure?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by marvun22, Sep 18, 2014.

  1. marvun22

    marvun22 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a Golden Laced Cochin that has both her feet in front of her and she can't move. After about 1 month, she finally eats and drinks without me sticking Tomatoes in her mouth and her beak in water. Is there any way to help her legs gain mobility back?
     
  2. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    Can you post a pic of her?

    With leg injuries it's important to keep them in the correct positions. If they get stuck out front, or behind, or one in front and one behind, or any other abnormal configuration, that compounds the problem and makes the chances of a recovery poorer. Long term rehabilitation is often needed, and the quicker the intervention the better. It can take up to 6 months but sometimes it happens much faster, even within a few hours there can be improvements. Not trying to discourage you, just give you some warning of the potential work ahead of you and her.

    You are most likely going to need to use a sling that gets her up off the ground and lets her legs fall back into natural position beneath her. Gradually she should begin to develop some strength etc... But, and it's a bit 'but', it depends what's wrong.

    Best wishes.
     
  3. Nambroth

    Nambroth Fud Lady

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    Maybe-- it matters why she developed paralysis, and if it has done any lasting damage. You may want to do some detective work. If you go to this link and scroll down to "Symptoms and Disease Details" there is a list of many ailments that can cause paralysis, from simple injury to complicated disease: https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/the-great-big-giant-mareks-disease-faq

    See if anything might fit for your hen. For example, your approach for helping her would vary depending on if it was an injury, or a vitamin deficiency, etc...

    No matter what caused it, you can probably expect to do some "physical therapy" with her after she has been immobile for a month.
    What is she currently eating?
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2014
  4. marvun22

    marvun22 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    She is eating layer feed right now. But for the first 3 weeks, I literally had to stick tomatoes into her mouth for her to eat anything at all.
     
  5. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    Why tomatoes?
     
  6. marvun22

    marvun22 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    She wouldn't, and I repeat, wouldn't, eat anything else. It was literally all she would eat.
     
  7. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    So she spat everything else out I guess? Since you were already having to stick it into her mouth to make her eat it.

    Pretty odd, being paralyzed in both legs doesn't stop them eating. Perhaps she had a bout of Marek's, that would also affect the neck in many cases. Sounds like whatever happened affected her brain function, for her to not eat or drink without assistance. The legs are not at fault then, just a secondary symptom.

    Best wishes.
     
  8. marvun22

    marvun22 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sorry I explained that wrong. She didn't even "eat" the tomatoes. She only ate the liquid or semi-liquid parts. Just like with water, I had to stick her beak into the liquid to get her to eat/drink it. She wouldn't eat anything. Everything had to be partially or fully liquid.
     
  9. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    Hmm. Marek's is a possibility, still, but severe neurological damage looks about the same almost no matter what's done it. Definitely a sling will be required, and some rehab time. If she's able to be rehabbed, that's the way to go about it.

    Best wishes with her.
     

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