Choosing rooster or 2 to keep

klunderwood

Chirping
Apr 30, 2018
23
38
89
Wooster AR
You won't know the real demeanor of the keeper until the others are gone.
Just pick one and hope for the best, while also monitoring your own behavior for success.

Can you say more about monitoring my behavior? I have read some about how to establish order but would like more info. I am used to training dogs for proper pack behavior, but not chickens. In other news, I separated Alpha and the Delta became Alpha and started just hogging the food and bullying the hens, pecking and pulling feathers for no reason. I want a rooster that signals food for the hens and shares, not runs them off so he can gobble it all. Now they are both in tractor time out. Watching them closely for aggression, but the Delta backs the Alpha down with body language only. At this point, I may rehome them both. My hens and the Beta are pretty calm and happy. Will wait and watch and see.
 

Tonyroo

Free Ranging
Mar 29, 2020
2,887
6,936
571
N. California
The cockerels behavior is normal at that age and hormone level. If you want to keep all 3, they need there own space away from the hen for 2 to 4 months.

It's only temporary, there hormone will subside. And you can put them back with the hens at a later time. And you will see how calm they'll be.
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
9 Years
Nov 27, 2012
100,694
143,881
1,867
SW Michigan
My Coop
My Coop
Can you say more about monitoring my behavior?
I make sure they are both kind of afraid of me and also know I won't hurt them.
I only handle them enough so they know they won't die if I touch them. I do this at night off the roost and use my soft voice with them, just grab them handle them a bit touching them all over, then put them back on the roost. I also handle the females the same way and more often, so both he and they know I won't hurt them. I also spend a lot of time walking thru the coop and run, never getting out of their way but walking 'thru' them. I don't try to touch or handle the birds in the daytime, I leave them to be chickens. Hand feeding can help too. It's most important to be calm and cool while around the birds, if you are nervous/fearful, it makes them nervous and more likely to panic or attack.
 

klunderwood

Chirping
Apr 30, 2018
23
38
89
Wooster AR
I make sure they are both kind of afraid of me and also know I won't hurt them.
I only handle them enough so they know they won't die if I touch them. I do this at night off the roost and use my soft voice with them, just grab them handle them a bit touching them all over, then put them back on the roost. I also handle the females the same way and more often, so both he and they know I won't hurt them. I also spend a lot of time walking thru the coop and run, never getting out of their way but walking 'thru' them. I don't try to touch or handle the birds in the daytime, I leave them to be chickens. Hand feeding can help too. It's most important to be calm and cool while around the birds, if you are nervous/fearful, it makes them nervous and more likely to panic or attack.

Thank you for clarifying, that helps a lot. Pretty much what I have been doing, but I was wondering if, like with dogs, there are certain things to do/not do to keep them on their best behavior. The only time I got nervous was when they circled me the other day. Reminded me how I was afraid of our chickens as a child since we had mean roosters who would come at me in the coop.
 

LaFleche

Meadow Devil
9 Years
Sep 22, 2012
7,313
26,930
932
Germany
but I was wondering if, like with dogs, there are certain things to do/not do to keep them on their best behavior.
Many chickens are afraid of bright red, orange or rubyred colours and wild big graphic patterns. The react alarmed and roosters will often attack the object showing the above mentioned colours or patterns.

So it would be best to avoid the agitation by wearing muted colours while attending to chicken tasks.
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom