Cocci prevention

mickielee

In the Brooder
6 Years
Aug 15, 2013
28
1
24
Battle Ground, Wa.
~~Hi all! I am curious how you maintain your flock health. I have had chickens a little over a year. My chickens are free range during the day and locked up in a coop at night until we build a proper coop where they can be contained all the time. Unfortunately, the new chicks that I had gotten ended up with coccidiosis and 4 of the six chicks died. :( After cleaning everything and treating the whole flock (just in case) I am confidante that the cocci is gone. However, now, I am completely paranoid of my flock getting sick with it again. I watch for any signs of illness and they seem to look healthy but the spectrum of poop color has me concerned. I know that normal chicken poop can be pretty much any color but when it is dark, I immediately think cocci. Do you periodically medicate the water of your birds for cocci prevention? Do you wait till one is obviously sick? I am turning into a crazy chicken lady. I found a rooster hunched in the sun and had to go check him out.. He was just sleeping and was happy till I disturbed him. Can you offer suggestions of how to manage my coop with out me going crazy and stressing my birds out. ?? Thank you for your input. ~Mickie
 

Judy

Crowing
Premium member
10 Years
Feb 5, 2009
34,024
523
448
South Georgia
Cocci is a fairly complex matter and I don't think there is a simple answer. But, in case it helps, a little info:

Ammonia will kill cocci when used to disinfect a coop, but bleach won't -- and you can't disinfect soil. Cocci are always in the soil. Adult chickens have normally developed an immunity to the local strains of cocci by the time they are adults, but might in turn get sick if moved to different property. Some chicken keepers have a chronic problem with them, and for others, the problem only seems to attack once. Some people who have had a problem treat preventively for it with Corid, but I dont know a thing about how they dose for this. I also don't know how switching from free ranging to a coop and run setup will affect your situation, if at all.
 

Fred's Hens

Crowing
Premium member
9 Years
There are 8 strains and they carried about the globe by the wild birds. If your area is coccidiosis prone, and many folks have places that are, having powdered Corid on hand is simply a necessity. Those weeks between 5 and 9 are the time slot in which chicks haven't always developed their adult immunity. Corid (amprollium) is sold at TSC and other feed stores. I prefer the 20% powder form.

We don't put chicks on the ground anymore without a mild dose in the water. 1/2 teaspoon of powder per gallon. If there looks to be any kind of outbreak, that dose goes much higher, up a full teaspoon or even 2 teaspoons as needed.

Corid isn't an anti-biotic, it is merely a thiamine blocker that starves the coccidiosis.

Some folks have success in introducing a chunk of dirt or sod from their chicken run into the brooder to help build immunity earlier.

It also needs to be said that the amount of amproliium typically found in medicated feed is not strong enough to prevent some of these outbreaks of certain virulent cocci strains. For that reason, we don't bother with it.
 
Last edited:

casportpony

🦆🦚Enlightened🦚🦆
Project manager
Premium member
7 Years
Jun 24, 2012
90,070
180,248
1,932
For those that like pictures:





-Kathy
 

bwolfe

Chirping
5 Years
Apr 23, 2014
107
2
81
I have looked in TSC for the corid but can only find it for cattle. Is this the same thing I need for my Chicks? And I have a white meet chicken who has the runs really bad I have tried probiotics, antibiotics, vitamins and electrolytes nothing has helped so I am worried its the cocci.
 

casportpony

🦆🦚Enlightened🦚🦆
Project manager
Premium member
7 Years
Jun 24, 2012
90,070
180,248
1,932
I have looked in TSC for the corid but can only find it for cattle. Is this the same thing I need for my Chicks? And I have a white meet chicken who has the runs really bad I have tried probiotics, antibiotics, vitamins and electrolytes nothing has helped so I am worried its the cocci.
Corid for cattle is what you need, but the directions for chickens aren't on it.
FDA recommendations:
http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/animaldrugsatfda/details.cfm?dn=013-149
"Chickens
Indications: For the treatment of coccidiosis.
Amount: Administer at the 0.012 percent level in drinking water as soon as coccidiosis is diagnosed and continue for 3 to 5 days (in severe outbreaks, give amprolium at the 0.024 percent level); continue with 0.006 percent amprolium-medicated water for an additional 1 to 2 weeks."


Below are the per gallon doses for poultry

The preventative dose (.006%) for Corid Powder is 1/3 teaspoon.
The preventative dose (.006%) for Corid liquid is 1/2 teaspoon.

The moderate outbreak dose (.012%) for Corid Powder is 3/4 teaspoon.
The moderate outbreak dose (.012%) for Corid liquid is 1 teaspoon.

The severe outbreak dose (.024%) for Corid Powder is 1.5 teaspoons.
The severe outbreak dose (.024%) for Corid liquid is 2 teaspoon.

FWIW, I'd also worm with Safeguard for goats is she were mine. The amount I use lately is .5ml per 2.2 pounds (50mg) 5 days in a row. Can you post a picture of her poop?

-Kathy
 

GreenLove

Chirping
Mar 3, 2015
123
9
68
There are 8 strains and they carried about the globe by the wild birds. If your area is coccidiosis prone, and many folks have places that are, having powdered Corid on hand is simply a necessity. Those weeks between 5 and 9 are the time slot in which chicks haven't always developed their adult immunity. Corid (amprollium) is sold at TSC and other feed stores. I prefer the 20% powder form.

We don't put chicks on the ground anymore without a mild dose in the water. 1/2 teaspoon of powder per gallon. If there looks to be any kind of outbreak, that dose goes much higher, up a full teaspoon or even 2 teaspoons as needed.

Corid isn't an anti-biotic, it is merely a thiamine blocker that starves the coccidiosis.

Some folks have success in introducing a chunk of dirt or sod from their chicken run into the brooder to help build immunity earlier.

It also needs to be said that the amount of amproliium typically found in medicated feed is not strong enough to prevent some of these outbreaks of certain virulent cocci strains. For that reason, we don't bother with it.
My chicks are exactly 2 weeks old. What age should I introduce the "chunk of dirt or sod"? I have the liquid corid that I bought (just in case of an outbreak), when (a few days before sod?) should I use that for preventative measures?
 

Trefoil

Songster
8 Years
Dec 7, 2011
2,317
227
231
I have had poultry for 50 years and am reasonably confident that for whatever reason cocci isn't a problem in my area. The only poultry that has had it was a turkey that I treated and recovered. I feed everything medicated starter, chickens,turkeys,guineas,peas,quail,except ducks and geese. I also add ACV in their water until they are adults and sometimes even then. Not when medicating with anything else or worming. For the last several years I have been feeding fermented feed to everyone as well. I give suitable dry crumbles on the side depending on if its duck, chickens,peas, or whatever. The coons ( predominate predator in my area) and I have an understanding which has nearly eliminated losses due to predation. I contain my birds in predator proof housing and they can't get in to eat them. If they get desperate, they raid my grain storage. I currently have over 100 birds, 13 of which are in the brooder still. Until I start having losses I recommend putting ACV in their water and feeding medicated food.
 
Top Bottom