Coccidiosis?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Toastyone, Apr 18, 2017.

  1. Toastyone

    Toastyone Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 13, 2011
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    So I have 8 almost week old chicks to 3 week old chicks. They are being raised in a diy brooder in my house, all came from the same local hatchery and are on medicated chick starter. I'm cleaning their brooder (large plastic tub) every other day and we have no other poultry. Today while cleaning their pen I noticed someone is having soft dark brown bowel movements. Everyone is perky and doesn't other wise look off. Should I be worried? The poop smells like their chick starter, not like normal droppings. If they're already being medicated through feed do I just have to wait it out and hope?

    This is my poor husbands first experience with "livestock" so if I can do anything to not lose any chicks I would like to
     
  2. Hillaire

    Hillaire Chillin' With My Peeps

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    doesn't sound like cocci to me... I would keep an eye on the chicks to make sure that they are all perky and also make sure they don't get pasty butt... the most common form of cocci causes the poop to be a little bloody so keep an eye on that... I would say make sure the bedding is dry but sounds like you are doing a great job keeping everything fresh. Hope that helps
     
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  3. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    Probably just normal cecal.
     
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  4. Toastyone

    Toastyone Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 13, 2011
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    I'm probably just over reacting but I'm pretty sure my husband will cry if one of the chicks dies, he was a city kid lol. I pulled apart and inspected it, it wasn't mucousy and had no blood. There is one we call "Mrs. Poopy ********" but it isn't caked, she just has a lot of fluff back there.
     
  5. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    To get them used to the microbes in your local soil, I suggest giving them a clump of sod to nibble on in their brooder.
     
  6. Toastyone

    Toastyone Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 13, 2011
    Reaford, NC

    We don't have sod, we live in the "sandhills" in North Carolina, should I give them a dish of sand from outside? They're going to be in a covered run with cement floor that I'll be putting contractors sand in.
     
  7. Hillaire

    Hillaire Chillin' With My Peeps

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    that is a really great idea, I think I am going to use that method... thanks
     
  8. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    Sand/dirt/soil/sod, whatever they will be exposed to once they move outdoors. They will nibble on it for grit and they will use it for dust bathing. Any weeds, worms, or grass that come along with it are added bonuses.
    Controlled exposure is the best preventative for coccidia.
     
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  9. coach723

    coach723 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I always do this with brooder raised chicks, and has worked very well. I have cocci in my soil and have not had an outbreak in 3+ years running.
    I have very sandy soil, I use a large heavy plastic plant saucer (too heavy to tip), and put in dry soil from outside once they start trying to dust bathe.
    I start with soil from outside my chicken run, and gradually start adding a little from inside the chicken run. I clean it daily, and they make a big mess!
    They love seeing the saucer coming!! It gets them used to all the 'stuff' in the soil more gradually. It has worked very, very well for me.
     

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