comb genetics?

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by ki4got, Oct 17, 2011.

  1. ki4got

    ki4got Hatch-a-Holic

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    Ok, reading up on comb genetics, I still have a few questions...

    I have eggs in the 'bator right now, that are potential crosses between several bantam breeds.

    my roos: black Japanese, Sultan(white), and possibly (but doubtful) my crele OEGB (low man on the totem pole, the girls don't like him much)

    my hens: quail d'anvers, dark brahma, silver duckwing oegb.

    now i should be able to tell at hatching what the chicks are crossed with by their combs, i would think.

    any rose combs would be jap/d'anvers, peas jap/brahma, and singles jap/oegb, right?

    but what do those 3 (pea rose single) look like when crossed with a V-comb? granted if it's got 5 toes i'll know the sultan was in on it, but otherwise? and if any come out barred i'll know my oegb roo was at it, as the barring is sex linked, so they'd be hens?

    or would I be able to tell from coloring at a glance as well? chicken colors still confuse me, but i'm getting there (slowly)

    thanks for any help. I know i can jsut wait to watch them grow but i like to predict ahead of time and see how close i came LOL.
     
  2. Illia

    Illia Crazy for Colors

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    A good V comb x Single comb = a single comb with a split blade or two separate single combs joined at the front.

    A good V comb x Rose comb = A mockery of a butterfly/leaf type comb or something that looks like a very smooth, row-less pea comb. Kinda like a rose comb without any lumps.


    Barring is only sex-linked if the FEMALE was the barred parent. [​IMG]
     
  3. ki4got

    ki4got Hatch-a-Holic

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    Quote:ok thanks on the combs, but in birds, the female has the XY (some use XZ), the male XX. so if the barring is carried on the sex chromosome (meaning it's a sex-linked trait) then the male would have 2 copies to pass, so if the female donates a Y chromosome to the male's X(barred) chromosome, the result would be a barred female...

    i wasn't questioning the result, but IF the barring is sex-linked. and so far everything i've read says that it is... but breeding a female with sex-lined trait to a male without the trait, you'll only get males split to the trait and females that don't carry it at all (because it's not carried on the Y chromosome).

    i do have a degree in genetics (ok a minor, but still), i just don't know CHICKEN mutations yet... but i'm studying up on them.

    edit: i just couldn't find the info on the combs i was looking for specifically...
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2011
  4. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    Quote:I'll stay away from your other questions, but this one is "no". Barring "B" is dominant over not barred "b" so all it takes is one copy of B to be present for the chicken to be barred. But the kicker is that the Rooster has two copies of that gene, but a hen only has one. The rooster will give a B or b gene to each of its offspring, but the hen will only give a B or b to her sons. Her daughter is left out.

    Assume the rooster is pure for barred, or "BB" and the hen is not barred "b-". The rooster will give a B gene to each offspring but the hen will only give a b to her sons. So the male offspring will be Bb and will be barred. The female offspring will be B- and will also be barred.

    If you reverse this where the hen is barred "B-" and the rooster is not barred "bb", the male offspring will be Bb and will be barred. The female offspring will be b- and not barred. This is where you get your sex links, where the hen is barred and the rooster is not.
     
  5. ki4got

    ki4got Hatch-a-Holic

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    Quote:I'll stay away from your other questions, but this one is "no". Barring "B" is dominant over not barred "b" so all it takes is one copy of B to be present for the chicken to be barred. But the kicker is that the Rooster has two copies of that gene, but a hen only has one. The rooster will give a B or b gene to each of its offspring, but the hen will only give a B or b to her sons. Her daughter is left out.

    Assume the rooster is pure for barred, or "BB" and the hen is not barred "b-". The rooster will give a B gene to each offspring but the hen will only give a b to her sons. So the male offspring will be Bb and will be barred. The female offspring will be B- and will also be barred.

    If you reverse this where the hen is barred "B-" and the rooster is not barred "bb", the male offspring will be Bb and will be barred. The female offspring will be b- and not barred. This is where you get your sex links, where the hen is barred and the rooster is not.

    ok... didn't realize that barred was dominant sexlinked. i was presuming recessive sexlinked... in which case it would be the hen only that got the trait. I've worked with cockatiel genetics for YEARS and (as of when I stopped breeding) there were no dominant sex-linked traits (just cinnamon, pearl, lutino). that may have changed in the last 15+ years...

    so basically if he had anything to do with anything, then the chicks will be barred. (he's pure bred crele oegb) that makes sense now.
     

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