Congested 11 month old d'Anver pullet

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by AMERAUCANAS4REAL, Mar 30, 2018.

  1. AMERAUCANAS4REAL

    AMERAUCANAS4REAL Crossing the Road

    2,771
    37,927
    967
    Nov 8, 2017
    Upper Midwest
    My Coop
    I have a 11 month old d'Anver pullet that sounds congested, fluid in the lungs? We have had an outbreak of respiratory infections in our chickens, but they have been put under control, except in roosters with mites. Those have mostly died suddenly and we seemed to have gotten mites under control. I checked her for mites thoroughly, and she had none. No feather problems except picking on her head, she was in a cage with a rooster and two other hens. The symptoms of the previous disease were mucus in mouth and sinuses and sometimes foamy or mucus filled eyes. She has no mucus in eyes or mouth or sinuses. The only signs of sickness are the congested breathing and a weak stance as well as overall paleness. There is a drop in production of eggs from the cage and she has laid eggs before. Not certain if she is laying or not. Poop seems normal. The rooster with her seems weak as well, unfortunately he was too fast to catch. Keep or cull? The newest introduction to our flock were eight 9 week old Anconas, seven pullets and one cockerel. Added this Wednesday, I believe. They have no signs of sickness. Culling is an option for her and the rooster since many more are coming from the eggs from these cages. I don't want our whole flock to get sick again so one pair is a small sacrifice. She is in a cage in the house right now, by herself.
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2018
  2. AMERAUCANAS4REAL

    AMERAUCANAS4REAL Crossing the Road

    2,771
    37,927
    967
    Nov 8, 2017
    Upper Midwest
    My Coop
    Her right now, excuse the bald spots on her head, picking. IMG_20180330_1825048_rewind.jpg
     
  3. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

    42,788
    25,812
    1,012
    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    Most respiratory diseases are contagious and make carriers for life of all chickens exposed whether they get sick or not. The only exception is infectious bronchitis (IB,) which makes them carriers for up to a year after the last affected chicken recovers. What you are dealing with may be mycoplasma (MG,) coryza, or a combination. It is hard to know without testing, and getting a necropsy done on a sick bird by your state vet would get you a diagnosis. MG and coryza can come back whenever a chicken is stressed such as cold winter weather or molting.

    A severe case of respiratory disease, unless it is caused by a virus, can be treated with antibiotics such as Tylan 50 injectable, used orally, and the eye infection can be treated with Terramycin ointment twice a day. Those may be found at feed stores in the cattle section or ask a clerk. Dosage of Tylan 50 injectable orally is 0.2 ml per pound given 2-3 times a day for 5 days. You can give it by injection, but it can cause muscle damage. There is a good article from University of Florida if you Google “common poultry diseases.”
     
    Wyorp Rock and AMERAUCANAS4REAL like this.
  4. AMERAUCANAS4REAL

    AMERAUCANAS4REAL Crossing the Road

    2,771
    37,927
    967
    Nov 8, 2017
    Upper Midwest
    My Coop
    Ok. I have heard all this information before. I was hoping it wasn't happening. We tried to get a bird tested, but it was too expensive.
     
  5. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

    42,788
    25,812
    1,012
    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    Actually, getting a necropsy on a sick bird or a bird that dies may be easier and less expensive. You can read the links about the different diseases and symptoms and guess, but getting a necropsy can give a lot of information. Each state is different, some states can be free or minimal cost, and some more expensive. Calling or contacting your state vet and asking questions can be helpful. Some states are very good while others may be lacking in help. When there is a disease that makes carriers, selling or breeding birds is not a good thing to do. A necropsy may cost $75-100 here in Ohio, but it is a good way to know what is happening.
     
    Wyorp Rock likes this.
  6. AMERAUCANAS4REAL

    AMERAUCANAS4REAL Crossing the Road

    2,771
    37,927
    967
    Nov 8, 2017
    Upper Midwest
    My Coop
    We did check, it costs 100 to 400 dollars, unfortunately. We tried when we brought a bird to the avian vet. Unfortunately the range of medicine we could apply is lacking.
     
    ViolinPlayer123 likes this.
  7. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

    42,788
    25,812
    1,012
    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    If you go through a vet it may always be expensive. Most people just contact the state vet directly. Avian vets are outragiously expensive from what I have seen here. Even my regular vet is getting much more expensive. Some have reported that a few snotty vets won’t even deal with them, but others have good relations with their poultry owners. California charges $20 while a lady from New Hampshire paid $35 for one and got a lot of info. I have not got one in Ohio before, but at the last time I checked, it was $80. Some states have much more friendly and helpful poultry vets. It can depend on whether or not they have a poultry specialist at the vet schools I suppose.
     
    AMERAUCANAS4REAL likes this.

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by: