COOP HEATERS

KrisRose

Songster
12 Years
Mar 9, 2007
1,354
10
171
Davison, MI.
Richard-Woodlandwoman has a good idea, cover the run with plastic. Clear would be the best choice in that they would get natural light and have a larger coop. Put down shavings or leaves in the run and use this in the compost pile in the spring.
 

Catalina

Songster
12 Years
Jul 19, 2007
1,241
10
181
Minnesota
For everyone with flat panel heaters:

I just bought one, but I don't know where to install it.
The ceiling height is about 7ft. I'm using the deep litter method so the shavings are about 7 inches deep right now.

Should I install it on the ceiling? Will it provide enough heat?
Or should I install it on the wall? or will it be too close to the shavings?

I really don't want to burn down my coop/garage or house!
 

CovenantCreek

Chicks Rule!
12 Years
Oct 19, 2007
1,360
2
171
Franklin, TN
It won't provide enough heat to be installed on the ceiling. I've got mine standing on the floor (just outside the chicken wire divider, 2' or so from the waterer and the water froze the night before last). I doubt it could cause the shavings to burn, but I probably wouldn't put it low enough on the wall that the shavings would be in direct contact anyway.
 

patandchickens

Flock Mistress
12 Years
Apr 20, 2007
12,520
242
341
Ontario, Canada
Richard, have you considered that you probably CAN put the tractor in the garage if that's your overall plan for winter? Just take the chickens out first. Put them in a wire dog crate or cat carriers or sturdy cardboard boxes or whatever - this won't be for long, an hour max, and you could put them in the garage with a blanket over them. Then offer your S.O. or beer-drinking friends whatever inducements will get them to help you dig the tractor out , lift it up and schlep it in. Then put chickens back in of course


Before you dismiss this out of hand, let me say that 2 weeks ago my husband and I moved our 4x7x3 tractor pen and the 4x2x3 'house' that attaches to it into the garage despite almost a foot of really nasty iced-up ice-paved snow on the ground. Had to use the garden shovel to break it out of the ice, and it was not at all fun carrying the heavy components thru all that stuff on the ground, but it was not really all that terrible and now it's DONE.

Just a thought,


Pat
 

hb

In the Brooder
12 Years
Dec 19, 2007
24
0
22
SF Bay Area, California
Me and my DH just tried to install the flat panel heater from shop the coop on the ceiling and twice I got bonked on the head with the thing because it just wouldn't hold with the screws that they supply.

We chose the ceiling because our coop was converted from a rabbit hutch and that would give us the 3 ft. minimum clearance from the bedding.

My DH said to put a board down over the bedding and then stand it on that, but I don't think that is safe.

Because I already plugged it in and tested it out in my living room for the last few nights and the heater gets very hot to the touch, like, OUCH!

So, unfortunately, it's going to be sent back.

I think what sold me was that picture on their website of the hen roosting and looking all comfy in front of the heater. And it didn't look like it was 3 ft. away!
 

CovenantCreek

Chicks Rule!
12 Years
Oct 19, 2007
1,360
2
171
Franklin, TN
Quote:I've got mine less than 1' from the bedding. Even when it's been on for a few days straight it doesn't get hot enough to cause a problem. Direct contact with the bedding might cause problems, though.
 

WalkingOnSunshine

Crowing
11 Years
Apr 8, 2008
4,210
501
328
Ohio
Can chickens get frost bite. Its getting cold and how do you get all your chickens to get along.
Chickens can get frostbite, yes. But frostbite is a combination of cold + moisture, and if your coop is well ventilated and has dry bedding, they will not. Contrary to most of this thread, I would not get a heater for my coop. They are fire hazards, and chickens are actually much happier in cold weather than warm weather.

When you heat the coop, you are stopping them from acclimating to the cold properly. If they get used to the cold slowly as the seasons change, they will be fine well into negative numbers. We do not even consider heating the coop until -20 F. Think about how you would feel if you came into a warm house after you've been working outside in your winter coat and couldn't take that winter coat off--your chickens have built-in winter coats that they can never remove. Give them a draft free but well-ventilated coop and they will be fine without heat. If you live someplace far north, search for the threads from the Alaskan BYCers about how they heat (and don't heat) their coops.

We had some -20 F days last year, and didn't even get frostbite on the white Leghorns, that have combs so big they flop over their eyes. We have had a bit of frostbite on big rooster combs in the past, but traced it back to wet bedding under a waterer, not the cold temps.
 
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