1. silkie1472

    silkie1472 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    One year ago, we built a large coop for our chickens. They have always lived in a 100 sq. ft. coop, so we decided that they would like more space. There are only 6 of them, and clearly that was large enough, but I wanted something nicer. So now their coop is 100 sq. ft. with a 1100+ sq. ft. run. Now that everything is settled in, and I have gotten new chickens last year, I would like to plant something in the run. I would also like to get a white leghorn rooster as all six of my chickens are white leghorn pullets. What would be the best seeds to plant in the run? Should I order a male leghorn as a baby chick?
     
  2. cavemanrich

    cavemanrich Overrun With Chickens

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    If you get a chick, regardless of gender, you will have to raise it to sufficient size separated, until it is large enough to be integrated with your hens. Unless hens brood their own chicks, outsiders are not always welcomed. Leghorns are not at the top of friendly chickens also. You should be able to find a halfway grown cockerel for possible free adoption . Maybe a small fee. Everyone wants hens, and the cockerels are just not wanted as much.
    As to planting in your run, grass would be good. If you plant other eatable veggies, they will usually get destroyed early on as the chickens will eat the early sprouts eagerly.
    WISHING YOU BEST [​IMG]
     
  3. silkie1472

    silkie1472 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I knew that a baby chick would have to be raised separately; I was just wondering if I should get one as a chick to prevent the possible spread of dieseases to my current flock. As for planting, I am trying to decide between Bermuda grass, different kinds of clover, and possibly wheat.
     
  4. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    Even if I knew where you lived and what your climate is I would not know what plants grow well in your area. If you are in the USA your county extension office would know. If you are somewhere else, you probably have an agricultural department that can help with types of plants. In any case I’d be looking for a mix, a variety, so you have different things that grow at different times of the year.

    Some people like to start with baby chicks, some like to start with older birds. We all have our reasons. It helps answer this type of question when we know your criteria. In your second post you gave one thing that concerns you, biosecurity. To me here are two ways to bring new chickens into your flock with a very high level of confidence that you will not have biosecurity issues, either get hatching eggs from a source you consider safe or buy chicks from an established hatchery. Lots of people bring older birds in without issues, but some do have very serious issues if they bring new birds in. Quarantine can help with some of these issues, but it does not cover everything. Some birds can have a personal immunity to some things yet still be carriers. Quarantine doesn’t help much with that.

    I don’t know what other criteria you have when making this decision. And you face the logistics problems of getting the chick if you only want one and of raising it yourself. I don’t know how I could get just one chick and know it is a cockerel. I would not raise a chick by itself. But maybe you are looking at getting several chicks, which is the way I’d approach it.

    There are just too many unknowns for me to know what is best for you. I don’t know your criteria.
     
  5. silkie1472

    silkie1472 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oh no, I would never raise a chick by itself unless I had a broody hen. I hatch silkies on a regular basis so they would fit right in. By the way, I live in Arkansas.
     
  6. cavemanrich

    cavemanrich Overrun With Chickens

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    Get a few leghorn fertile eggs and set them under your silkies. Chances of getting roosters seem more likely then the sought after hens. [​IMG]
     
  7. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    For planting forage in the runs, I suggest grazing frames. You basically make a wooden box with a hardware cloth screen on top. Then scatter your seeds inside. The chickens will eat what grows through the wire, but they can't dig up and damage the roots. Fertile eggs under a broody is probably the easiest way to add to your Leghorn flock.
     
  8. silkie1472

    silkie1472 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Okay. Today my dad went to pick me up some laying pellets for my grown white leghorns, and I told him to check to see if they would be able to get me a whitle leghorn cockerel chick. They said that they would order one and that it should be in next week. I have silkie chicks right now ranging from 3 to 4 weeks. I was wondering if this baby chick could be raised with them as the chicks are not very mean or if I would have to put him with one of my grown silkie hens. Any advice?
     
  9. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    The age difference would likely be too great. Day old chicks need a lot more heat than 4 week old chicks. This could mean that he could end up chilled trying to keep up with the silkie chicks or the silkie chicks could end up overheated. Do not put him with adult birds and hope for the best. Unless a hen has been brooding for a few weeks, it's very unlikely that she will spontaneously rear the chick.
     
  10. silkie1472

    silkie1472 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I am using a brooder from brinsea that holds up to 50 chicks, and I have been able to add silkie chicks with older chicks. So I will see how he gets treated with the other chicks before making my final decision.
     

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