Coughing/Sneezing Brahma.

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by JohnsonHomested, Nov 15, 2012.

  1. JohnsonHomested

    JohnsonHomested Out Of The Brooder

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    We just bought two Light Brahmas that I believe are around a year old. They're at the end or beginning (not sure how to tell) of a molt. I noticed shortly after bringing them home and throwing them in quarantine that one of the hens is coughing/sneezing. Other than that she seems fine. It's been a week and a half. I'm wondering how to tell the difference between a disease and something environmental. My wife threw one of our other hens in with the two quarantined birds (bad behavior and she needed more room) and she coughed a little immediately after being put in the run. This makes me think (hope) it might be environmental. Is there any way to tell? If it is a disease should I assume the other hen is a carrier as well? If I get rid of the sickie do I need to sterilize the run before using it again?
     
  2. JohnsonHomested

    JohnsonHomested Out Of The Brooder

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    Okay, no response yet so I'm going to upload a video. This might take a second.
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2012
  3. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Environmental problems would be such things as a bird snorting feed dust while eating causing her to sneeze/cough, pollen, previous pesticide use on the ground, ammonia fumes from soiled bedding etc...
    Here's a link to respiratory diseases in poultry. Check out the following diseases that might match the symptoms you described, keep in mind that symptoms for those diseases vary from mild to wild: Specifically look at Infectious Bronchitis (IB,) Infectious Coryza, Mycoplasma
    Gallisepticum (MG.)
    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps044
    These diseases above are transmittable to other birds. You have to make the decision as to what you're dealing with...an environmental issue or a respiratory problem. Perhaps bloodwork can be drawn by a vet from your sickest bird and be submitted for analysis, then you'll know for sure. Then make a decision based on those results.
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2012
    1 person likes this.
  4. JohnsonHomested

    JohnsonHomested Out Of The Brooder

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    *bump* for added videos....
     
  5. JohnsonHomested

    JohnsonHomested Out Of The Brooder

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    I'm reading the symptoms from the above listed link and most of the respitory diseases are accompanied by a discharge of some kind. I'm not seeing a discharge.
     
  6. cowcreekgeek

    cowcreekgeek Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Good lookin' arrangements, but dawg53 brought up some good points to consider ... yet, it seems less likely to be purely environmental when one would sneeze w/o the other bird that's most probably directly related responding in similar fashion; the other sneezing immediately could still be symptomatic of some manner of respiratory illness, unless y'all have been scrubbing up 'n changing your shoes prior to and after visiting each area.

    For certain, I'd immediately put every bird on an astringent solution of Apple Cider Vinegar, at the rate of 4 teaspoons to every gallon of water (but not in galvanized containers). This can absolutely do no bird any harm, under any circumstances I've ever heard of, but can do some pretty remarkable stuff -- of greatest importance, the tannin in ACV reduces the viscosity of mucus, and helps to 'cut through' any coating w/in the mouth, throat and intestines, which helps the birds to expel it more easily, and improves the uptake of nutrients/vitamins, further boosting their immune systems.

    With respiratory ailments, the improvements can often be seen w/in the first few days (if not almost immediately ~'-)
     
  7. JohnsonHomested

    JohnsonHomested Out Of The Brooder

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    Going to try the apple cider vinegar right now.
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2012
  8. cowcreekgeek

    cowcreekgeek Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm sure it'll help ... just lost two guineas (one discovered by the odor), and am trying to recover one chicken that (in my case) has been poisoned by the toxins from botulism. Sorta ironic, that the one thing that woulda prevented this is what I'm givin' her now: ACV in the water. From this day forward, I shall *always* include some, save for not mixing it w/ other chemical compounds. The toxin from this bacteria is among the most poisonous known, and this shows how quickly some things can happen ... suspect one male killed the other two days ago, but this spiraled, quite literally, overnight.

    I'm not suggesting that there is some dramatic plaque descending upon your flock; there's a good chance that the sneezing will begin improving soon, but be sure 'n keep a close watch on your flock for any other symptoms.
     
  9. wantbantams

    wantbantams Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I am having the same problem with my LB. I am so sad because I do not know what is wrong. This has been going on for over 2 weeks now with no changes at all. She is still coughing. Checked her throat and it looks pretty good. Used ACV and that is not helping. If you learn anything else please let me know and I will do the same for you. I am going to try to contact the state vet to see what they have to say.

    1 more question. Did you notice that the cough came on when the weather got cold?
     
  10. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    She could possibly have something stuck in her crop or throat. Give her an eyedropperful of olive oil orally. Then massage from her throat down to her crop. She'll either pass or puke whatever is stuck.
     

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