Curious Behavior

Discussion in 'Guinea Fowl' started by Kitcat, Sep 26, 2012.

  1. Kitcat

    Kitcat New Egg

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    Sep 26, 2012
    I kept five guineas in my chicken pen for a year with seven chickens and they got along fine . I tried to put my five month old pullets in with them but the guinea hens attacked them so I put the guineas outside so they could run with the eight five month old free range guineas (six hens and two males). The outside guineas viciously attacked the two hens and and ran them off. I now have to feed and water them in the front pasture and they run off if the others get close. Does anyone know what is going on?
     
  2. Kevin565

    Kevin565 Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    [​IMG]

    How long has the running off behavior been going on for? They could be trying to let them know who's in charge.
     
  3. PeepsCA

    PeepsCA Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You put 5 Guineas out, but the flock only accepted 3 of them? Are you positive the 2 they are running off are Hens, or are they males?

    Guineas need to be acclimated to each other gradually to be succesfully integrated... established, territorial flocks don't usually instantly accept new additions right away (especially while it's still breeding/laying season). Housing them side by side but separated by wire for anywhere from a couple wks up to six wks or more so they gradually get used to each other is what usually works best for most people when they are integrating new birds into their flocks.

    Since your older flock is already free ranging then if you have a large wire dog crate that you can put the 2 other birds in and then keep them in that out in the area that all the older birds free range that should help them get used to seeing each other (and the other birds will not be able to run them off). You will want to bring the crate into the safety/shelter of the coop each night tho.

    Once the weather cools down and the daylight hours shorten my flocks all settle down and there is less aggression. And that may be when your flock finally accepts the 2 birds (that is if those 2 live that long and don't get taken by a predator before then).
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2012
  4. Kitcat

    Kitcat New Egg

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    Sep 26, 2012
    I put all five out four day ago. The two hens were attacked so badly that they were bloody. They tried to come back to the coop several time for two days but were attacked each time. I actually thought they had been caught by a coyote because of all the feathers until I saw them being attacked. Now they hide and run away if the flock comes close.
     
  5. Kitcat

    Kitcat New Egg

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    Sep 26, 2012
    Yes, I'm positive they are hens. They have been able to see each other since the free rangers were several weeks old since the pens are next to each other. The three roos are accepted but do not free range with them since they stay around the pen all the time. The two hens are a year old and the free rangers were hatched the first week in May. I don't understand this behavior. I thought the roos would be the ones to fight but they don't.
     
  6. Kitcat

    Kitcat New Egg

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    Sep 26, 2012
    Here's a undate on my situation. Coyotes caught two of the guinea roosters and both hens. Seems like they were not predator savy like the free range flock and not as good flyers. Guess I won't keep any more guineas in the pen for a year and then try to acclimate them to free range. The remaining rooster has become the boss of the free rangers.(Three males and six hens)
     
  7. tomingreeneco

    tomingreeneco Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sorry about your loss. [​IMG]
    Coyotes : Trap em' and shoot them, the only way you'll get rid of them. It is a constant battle.
     

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