Day 23-Eggtopsy ***GRAPHIC PIC WARNING***

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by akpeeps, Jul 25, 2010.

  1. akpeeps

    akpeeps Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 25, 2008
    Wasilla, Alaska
    One lone BBS Orp egg went in lockdown last Tuesday. There was movement through Wed then nothing. Yesterday, day 22, there was more movement in the afternoon so I left it alone. I candled late Saturday night and didn't see any movement.
    I candled again this morning but there was still nothing happening so I decided to see what was going on.

    Really large air cell
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    Fully formed chick but the yolk sac wasn't absorbed
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    This was the one shipped egg out of nine that developed and the only shipped egg that I've ever had develop at all so needless to say I'm so disappointed.
     
  2. peterlund

    peterlund Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sad to see the little fella died, but great photos to show those of us what goes on in the shell. Better luck next time, and thanks for taking the time to document.
     
  3. thumbless

    thumbless Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 30, 2009
    Mesa AZ
    I don't think this has anything to do with shipped eggs as I have had several do this from my own eggs.
     
  4. akpeeps

    akpeeps Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 25, 2008
    Wasilla, Alaska
    Quote:Me too. I'm hoping it was just a case of bad luck.
    The only thing that was different than my other hatches was that I incubated in a forced air but ended up having to use a still air for hatching. The still air actually held the temp and humidity more consistently that the forced air.
    I hope it wasn't switching from forced air to still air because I have one more going in lockdown tomorrow.
     
  5. burquechick

    burquechick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would suspect too low temperature combined with too high humidity, but I'm no eggspert.
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2010
  6. Freebie

    Freebie Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 4, 2007
    Bloomingdale, MI
    Quote:Interesting, my last 2 hatches, had several like that. I was thinking the humidity was to high, but did not consider the temp being to low. I have noticed with the lower humidity, the temp seems to stay a little warmer. It has been a steady 101-102 in a still air. Lockdow is on Tuesday. Sure hope all turns out well, or at least better that last time.
     
  7. burquechick

    burquechick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 13, 2008
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    To me, if the chick was alive and kicking by day 22 (dead by day 23), but hadn't absorbed the yolk sac, that means that development was too slow. This indicates too low a temperature, but can also indicate too slow of moisture loss, as moisture loss promotes yolk sac absorption. Furthermore, the chick looks very wet from other, clear fluids, which to me means that the egg wasn't able to lose enough moisture. Temperature controls the rate of development, while humidity levels are there to slow the rate of moisture loss from the egg so that the chick isn't completely dried out by the time it goes to hatch. Too much humidity, and the chick can drown or the yolk sac may not be absorbed (and you can get omphalitis). Most of the literature says that temperature, even +/- 1 degree, is much more important than humidity. For humidity I think the numbers are something like, 40-60% humidity can still give you reasonable hatches. So I'm leaning towards too low a temperature during the incubation (or right at hatching). But keeping in mind that too much moisture in the egg also prevents the chick from properly absorbing the yolk sac. So I would also investigate the humidity levels. Although, it should be less likely.

    @Freebie: Your temperature looks good to me. You bring up a good point, however, which is if you are certain your temperatures are good, humidity is probably the culprit.
     
  8. akpeeps

    akpeeps Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 25, 2008
    Wasilla, Alaska
    Quote:So the humidity may have been too high in the still air? It stayed at 70%. The temp was a steady 100 with just one short spike to 102 after day 18. Should the temp have been 101-102?
    The temp in the forced air stayed at 99 with few spikes or drops while the humidity fluccuated between 40-50%.
    Hmm, sounds like the problem was after lockdown then?
     
  9. burquechick

    burquechick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 13, 2008
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    Quote:Ok, sounds to me like your temperature was too low AND humidity too high for sure. During incubation, you want to shoot for a 50% humidity. Plus or minus 5% is fine. Then at hatch, aim for 70%. And, since you are using a still air incubator, aim for 101-102 temperature (on top of the eggs). I would try to set it so that 100 was the low end of your range and 102 was the highest end. I know you are getting close to the fatal 103 temp, but it's really only fatal for prolonged periods of time. In a forced air incubator you are supposed to aim for 99.5 exactly, but mine usually fluctuates between 99 and 101, but mostly steady at 100. But that's a forced air, so it's different. So my recommendation would be for you to smidge up the temp a bit and cut the humidity way, by like, 20%.
     
  10. burquechick

    burquechick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 13, 2008
    Louisiana
    Oh wait, I didn't read carefully enough. I guess your humidity was fine then, but still the temperature does seem a bit low.
     

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