Decimated flock

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by blitz1027, Jan 11, 2016.

  1. hayley3

    hayley3 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I never had any trouble catching them in the havahart cage traps. And mine were fairly large raccoons. I surrounded my cages with straw bales and then covered them on top with straw, but I had a lot of raccoons so they were easy to catch, I think.

    Chickens are pretty smart really. We don't give them much credit but their fear makes them seem dumb when they are not. The older they are too, the more experienced and smarter. I just wish mine could talk so they could tell me what happened to the rest but that's not gonna happen.
     
  2. Egghead_Jr

    Egghead_Jr Overrun With Chickens

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    I'd look at the coop and figure why it's not predator proof. If it's that the door isn't shut at night then start locking it at night. No amount of cameras are going to make birds safer. That's the coops job.
     
  3. mechanic57

    mechanic57 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Priority 1 should be like egghead_jr said. Examine the coop for places that something could get in. A predator will come back for an easy meal. If you fix the coop and block off the access point it will still come stalking around testing the perimeter at least 1 time until it learns it's access is denied. Having the camera will let you see what you're fighting against and let you make further plans to protect birds. Hawks and owls won't get caught in a coon trap but until you figure out what the predator is for sure, it's not a bad idea to leave the traps out.
     
  4. pattyhen

    pattyhen Chicks Ducks oh my

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    Have you caught it yet? Please update us when you do. Good luck.
     
  5. blitz1027

    blitz1027 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    To answer your questions first I already know how it got in. Second no I have not caught it and not only that but it did decide to grab an early supper last night because it didn't even wait till sunset to get her. No body, no feathers nothing. She was gone without a trace. I don't think this critter even waited for her to roost. So starting last night I'm setting 3 traps a night. Didn't catch anything last night but I hope to have more luck tonight.
     
  6. dmanhefner

    dmanhefner Out Of The Brooder

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    No tracks?
     
  7. hayley3

    hayley3 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'd say you are dealing with a fox then. Will be harder to trap or unlikely. Lock chickens up safely.
     
  8. blitz1027

    blitz1027 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    No tracks, nothing. There was a large pile of poop in one corner of the pen. I'm thinking it looked to large for a mink or some such and was most likely a very large coon. This coon is seriously tough as the only way into the pen is right over an electric fence and we have that thing cranked up to the maximum voltage. So I know he's getting popped every time he goes into the pen but he hasn't been phased by it. Thinking maybe I should tie it in to the main power lines and fry that sucker.

    Angry doesn't even begin to describe how I feel right now over this.
     
  9. dmanhefner

    dmanhefner Out Of The Brooder

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    Whatever you do not hook electric fence up direct to power. A number of people have been killed that way over the years and it is a fire hazard. A camera and bait would show you exactly what is going on. Any over hanging trees or anything if that nature?
     
  10. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    My Coop
    Have you tested the wires themselves to make sure they aren't shorted?
     

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