Do Guineas attract more predator attention?

Discussion in 'Guinea Fowl' started by pontoosuc, Jul 22, 2010.

  1. pontoosuc

    pontoosuc Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 9, 2010
    Richmond, MA
    Also posted on "Managing your Flock" thread:

    We have 14 chickens in a nice coop with a pretty good run. They are in the run during the day
    then locked in the coop at night.

    Our 8 guineas will soon move from the brooder into the coop in a close, but separate area.
    The plan is to have the guineas free range during the day, and into the coop for the night.

    Question:

    Will these guineas cause more attention from predators than our chickens currently do with all
    the racket and noise? I guess in writing this I'm coming to the conclusion that, yes, they will draw
    in more predators.......

    Will the guineas be worth the risk?
     
  2. glenolam

    glenolam Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 19, 2009
    Canterbury, CT
    We didn't find that we had any more of a predator problem after we added our guineas. In fact, we've had less (knock on wood!). Our guineas live with our chickens as well and now everyone is allowed to free range together (the chicken pen was 100% enclosed, but our goats broke the fence - now they can free range in the goat pen as well as yard [​IMG] ) and everyone still comes home at night. I do spend the time to count just to make sure I have everyone inside - I found that sometimes one gets "lost" in coming home and stuck behind a fence they can easily walk through....so I have to shoo it home with the others...
     
  3. racuda

    racuda Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 1, 2008
    North Carolina
    The Guineas may even act as an early warning system. When my Guineas spot a hawk they sound an alarm which the chickens have learned to heed.
     
  4. Steve_of_sandspoultry

    Steve_of_sandspoultry Overrun With Chickens

    I don't think so, the guineas are pretty alert and good at sounding a warning. Our looses with them always came during the nesting season, they will nest and try to sit in the firewood pile or in the bushes and get picked off one by one at night. Now we keep the hens penned up and let the extra males range.

    Steve
     

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