Do I have to cull Cornish X hen?

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by psimek, Aug 14, 2007.

  1. psimek

    psimek Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi, Some of you know my chickens are at a school. We had 2 Cornish X chickens donated. The rooster really bullied the RIRs. I think I have at least 2 if not 3 (out of 4, egads) roosters in the RIRs, soooooo, last night I culled the Cornish X rooster. He was so heavy that he could hardly walk any more. The hen is not as heavy and takes the heat much better then he did. I estimate that she was hatched in April. My question is, do I have to cull her, or can I keep her for eggs? I don't care if she is a good layer or not, she has a real sweet disposition. With the roo, it was a little bit like put him out of his misery. Only a few students (who are children of employees) know about the white chicken, so the majority of the children won't be upset. Is it a misery for these birds to be so heavy?
     
  2. psimek

    psimek Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I guess there has to be some Cornish X hens or we wouldn't have any more Cornish X chickens. Somebody has to lay the eggs.
     
  3. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    Actually, cornish x's are made by crossing a Cornish hen and a rock rooster. You can try to keep her and some have done this and have had theirs lay eggs. Just keep an eye out for her and make sure she doesn't start suffering. To prolong her life, you can restrict her feed. Personally, I'd just eat her.
     
  4. Mac in Wisco

    Mac in Wisco Antagonist

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    If you put her on a diet she might survive. No more than a 1/4 pound of feed a day. If left to her own accord I doubt she would live longer than six months.

    I've heard of people keeping breeding flocks, but they usually bring in other breeds to generate a 3/4 cornish cross, a slower growing bird. They are still pigs and have to have the food rationed to them.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 14, 2007
  5. hinkjc

    hinkjc Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    I kept one once..she reached laying age, laid a few eggs, free ranged with my orpingtons and did well until suddenly at about 7 months old she flipped - had a heart attack. They don't survive long. If their legs don't go, their heart does. Sorry, but the best option is to cull her for dinner and know you did good by her for her short life.

    Jody
     
  6. psimek

    psimek Chillin' With My Peeps

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    See Jody, that's the thing. I'd hate for Hillary to have a heart attack in front of my kindegartners!
     
  7. hinkjc

    hinkjc Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    We thought by free ranging her, she would have better survivability, but it really didn't help. And she didn't hang at the food dish like people would think..she went with the other chickens and ranged on bugs and pasture most of the day. It's a tough decision, but one I've learned the hard way. Here are some pics of Snowball in her days. I know we gave her a good life, but I often wondered if she suffered as well.

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    Jody
     
  8. greyfields

    greyfields Overrun With Chickens

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    I believe most Cornish X hens will be dead before they reach point of lay. Except those you cross yourself (using less specialized strains of parents).
     
  9. justusnak

    justusnak Flock Mistress

    Hmmm...I have 3 cornishx hens....they are 22 weeks old now, and 2 of them are laying...tan eggs. I know my Buff Orp roo has bred them...so this weekend....8 of thier eggs are going in the bator. I just have to try to carry on thier legacy! They are really sweet gals. So far....they seem to be doing pretty well. The have managed the heat and humidity. They run and flap thier wings out in the yard...and just have a grand time. IF the seem to be suffering, I will cull them. But for now....they seem healthy and happy.
     

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