Do I need more ventilation

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by coopersmom, Dec 3, 2011.

  1. coopersmom

    coopersmom New Egg

    7
    0
    7
    Dec 3, 2011
    Can some tell me if I need more ventilation. See my byc page for pictures. They are only in there at night as they have a huge run which is about 50 to 60 feet by 30 or so feet and has a large tree the can get under. They have some ventilation on the low side of the roof which you can kind of see in the pictures. See my byc page under coop design
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2011
  2. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    Looks pretty good. I'd like to see some place for the warmest, humid air to exhaust. That is normally at the highest point of the roof. Can you provide some exhaust point at the high spot, under the roof? I don't know if your roof is metal or roll roofing or ? A simple roof vent cap would also work well on top.

    Looks like a half dozen hens? It's amazing how much vapor they create roosting, between their exhaling and pooping.
     
  3. coopersmom

    coopersmom New Egg

    7
    0
    7
    Dec 3, 2011
    It is metal roofing and there is some ventilation on the underside of the low side of the roof which you can kind of see in the pictures. There is a big door on the other side and I was thinking about putting a window/vent there. I will try to post pictures of that and if that would be a good place to put one
     
  4. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    Air can come in at the low point of your roof, correct? Question is, can the stale air exit at the high end? Can you match what you have at the low end and replicate that at the high end? If so, that would be ideal.

    The exit, the exhaust air leaves at the highest point of the roof.

    Think of the typical roof on a house. the eaves are perforated underhangs and this is where air enters the attic. The air exits the attic through the ridge vent, if there is one, or roof cap vents. This is what prevents humidity from building up in the attic of a house. A coop is ideally vented in similar fashion. In at the low end of the roof, out at the high end.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by