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Do "rough" eggshells indicate a deficiency?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by backintime, Jan 10, 2009.

  1. backintime

    backintime Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 7, 2008
    Northern Wisconsin
    I have 7 hens of various breeds, all laying nicely. Most of the eggs are very smooth similar to store-bought eggs, but a few have very rough shells that feel like sandpaper. Does this indicate a dietary deficiency or is it normal? They are on layer feed, plus finely crushed eggshells and they get many supplemental veggies, etc.

    Also, the membrane seems very tough on most of the eggs. I have to WORK to crack them!
     
  2. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    I've gotten a few rough egg shells from newly laying hens. I consider it to be just a hiccup in the laying system. I wouldn't worry unless it became a regular occurence.
    Also, the membrane is thicker and makes the egg harder to crack in our home fresh eggs compared to store bought. [​IMG]
     
  3. Carolina Chicken Man

    Carolina Chicken Man Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 29, 2008
    Raleigh, NC
    Can't answer the question regarding shell roughness, but the toughness of the membrane inside the shell is due to the eggs freshness.

    Store bought eggs are washed, which removes a light film on the outside of the shell that helps to preserve the egg. It is some type of natural chemical from the hen.

    Store bought eggs are then sprayed with something, mineral oil I believe.

    It's really bad trying to peel a boiled egg!!
     
  4. al6517

    al6517 Real Men can Cook

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    Quote:The term is BLOOM, a naturally accuring film that helps protect the egg's.
     
  5. Carolina Chicken Man

    Carolina Chicken Man Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 29, 2008
    Raleigh, NC
    Quote:The term is BLOOM, a naturally accuring film that helps protect the egg's.

    Yeah, like I said natural chemical from the hen that is a light film on the egg.
     
  6. keeperofthehearth

    keeperofthehearth Chillin' With My Peeps

  7. KrisRose

    KrisRose Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 9, 2007
    Davison, MI.
    Rough shells happen when eggs are delayed in the uterus and extra calcium is deposited. My ISA's are egg bound prone and have a fair amount of these eggs. Usually a shelless egg will follow since there is a backlog.
     
  8. chickiebaby

    chickiebaby Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 2, 2008
    western mass
    Not to worry, necessarily. I have several chickens who consistently lay like this. It may be, as the previous poster said, that the egg's on the way down longer. Or it may be, as I've been told, temporary excess of calcium, being naturally excreted, just as it should.

    Either way, I have not yet had an eggbound hen, ever in several years of seeing these beautiful individual eggs.
     
  9. backintime

    backintime Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 7, 2008
    Northern Wisconsin
    If sandpapery shells are indicative of excess calcium being excreted, should I cut back on the amount of ground eggshell I offer? I imagined the chickens would eat no more than what they need, but every time I sprinkle eggshell on their food, they seem to greedily gobble it up. Can I trust their instincts, or is there a rule of thumb to follow? I give them maybe 2 tbsp. per day total, for 7 hens.
     
  10. WoodlandWoman

    WoodlandWoman Overrun With Chickens

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    May 8, 2007
    Wisconsin
    I have one hen that lays an egg without much bloom on it. That egg never feels as silky smooth as the other eggs.
     

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